Hanging a large heavy kitchen cupboard - spring toggle or baton

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Hi,

I'm looking at fitting some kitchen cupboards in my utility room, but need some advice on hanging them.

The property is a new build with those metal batons instead of wooden and the cupboard is a boiler cupboard, but with shelves. To put it into context I already have a boiler cupboard housing the boiler on the left hand side of the wall and for symmetry want to put a boiler cupboard with shelves on the right hand side with an up and over cupboard between the two.

My question is about suitable fixings for the boiler cupboard as it'll be heavier and larger than a standard cupboard and will be able to store more, so even heavier when full.

How should I affix this to the wall. I was thinking about fixing some sort of baton onto the wall, but then I did see a Youtube video showing spring toggles holding 176Kg of weight! (
).

So, do I really need to fix a baton to the wall, or would the spring toggles suffice? Or should I be going into the breeze block?

Any advice welcomed.

I have some basic DIY knowledge, but haven't really touched carpentry.
 
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The property is a new build with those metal batons instead of wooden... ... ...Or should I be going into the breeze block?

You need to clarify exactly what your wall construction is first, those two statements contradict each other pretty much.

If you have blockwork behind the plasterboard (usually with a gap of about 1/2 inch), then you don't need to be looking at plasterboard fixings at all. If you have metal studs(vertical), this would normally be for internal walls only, rather than the inner leaf of a cavity wall (i.e. an external wall).

put a boiler cupboard with shelves on the right hand side with an up and over cupboard between the two.

Instead of using the brackets that come with the cupboards, you can buy a complete strip/rail(which has the same profile) that goes all the way across to distribute the load better, very important if they are hollow stud walls...

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/181393262141

You cut it down to length so it's not visible on the end one and you do need to notch a small amount of wood out of the back of the cupboard sides. It's all hidden when finished though.
 
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Thanks for the help guys.

Sorry about the confusion on the wall. I remember seeing it as they were building it and I thought it was breeze block with metal studs i.e. an internal load bearing wall with metal studs and plasterboard (Apologies, but I don’t know much about building walls).
 
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I thought it was breeze block with metal studs

OK, sounds like you could well have GypLyner or similar then...

upload_2018-10-8_18-57-15.png


upload_2018-10-8_18-57-53.png


Something like corefix fixings would be ideal then in order to fix into the block. They bridge the gap(up to 25mm) between the back of the plasterboard and the block so that the plasterboard doesn't pull in toward the wall and crack when you tighten the screws.

Could you drill a test hole to see what size gap you have to see if these are suitable?

edit: You don't need to bother with the rail I mentioned earlier doing it this way.
 
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