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Hardwired smoke alarm

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by an203888, 25 Jul 2020.

  1. an203888

    an203888

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    Hey all, I have a kitchen extension and am planning the wiring. Is a hardwired smoke alarm required? I have wireless battery operated fireangle alarms currently which won't link with a hardwired version?
     
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  3. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    It’s not required, and don’t put a smoke alarm in a kitchen. A heat alarm is what you need.

    A system where one alarm sets off all alarms is the best option. I have no idea if Fire Angel make such a thing that inter operates with your existing. I only ever use Aico alarms.

    edit, maybe this one.
    https://www.toolstation.com/10-year-battery-heat-alarm/p75947
     
    Last edited: 25 Jul 2020
  4. baldykev

    baldykev

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    Yes new build or extensions must have hardwired linked smoke alarms with battery back up fitted/ heat alarms. change them all to hardwired linked while you are at it
     
  5. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Really? I didn’t know that. Is that a new building regulation?
     
  6. an203888

    an203888

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    Well this just seems silly. Happy to put a hardwired heat alarm in extension but not putting hardwired alarms in rest of house this would mean chopping a few things about etc. Especially when I already have a perfectly functioning system. What are the benifits of a hardwired system? The battery and hardwired systems both seem like they need replacing after 10 years anyway.
     
  7. an203888

    an203888

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  8. baldykev

    baldykev

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    Any new build or extension should have at least one hard wired smoke alarm fitted, I think from 1992 . we had to fit wired ones in our extension part of building regs control.
    I only suggested fitting all wired alarms as they are linked and to each other and can give a better warning to people in every part of the property and stops people removing batterys when the are running low
     
  9. flameport

    flameport

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    Batteries run down, and when that happens the alarm doesn't work and no one will know unless it's actually tested by pressing the button.

    All alarms in a property should be linked together so that the alarm sound can be heard in every part of the property. That can be done with wires, or wireless.

    BS 5839-6:2019 covers smoke alarms in dwellings, and while that's not the law, it's the accepted standard that is used.
    Battery operated only is the lowest possible grade, and is not recommended for any new installations.
     
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  11. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    Surely the alarm beeps when the batteries are low, I think Nest sends a text message as well as a voice alert
     
  12. baldykev

    baldykev

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    Alarms do beeps when running low, but so many people remove the battery and never replace
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Definitely sensible - but, as TTC asked, what is the regulation that you think requires this (and has required it, from 1992 or whenever)?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. baldykev

    baldykev

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    ttps://tameside.gov.uk/buildingcontrol/guidancenotes/note16.pdf this was near what I was given a copy of when we fitted hardwired to our new extensions
     
  15. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    Deserve all they get really
     
  16. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    There are many sideways discussions on this "thread", on which I will not comment.
    The simple fact is that an interconnected set of photo-electric "Smoke Alarms", powered from the "mains" and each with battery "back-up", in all bed-rooms and living areas is a "good idea".
    Rechargeable Lithium batteries in these units are also a good idea - and all units should be replaced after ten years.
    (Yes, all of this may be relatively expensive - but what is the cost of a human life, which may be yours.)

    This is increasingly becoming "mandatory" in many jurisdictions.

    If it is not yet "mandatory" in your "jurisdiction", perhaps it should be.
     
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  17. flameport

    flameport

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    Requirements for smoke alarms is in Approved Document B, which for fire detection in dwellings mostly just repeats the requirements of BS 5839-6.

    Although that is not the only way to achieve compliance with building regulations, it's what building control will accept without argument and what the vast majority of people will use - just in the same way that Approved Document P suggests following BS7671 to achieve compliance.
     
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