How does this old rad connected?

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Hi
I have an old towel rad to replace, pls see pics. I can see the hot water pipes are fed where the valves are. Two questions:
1. Is there any pipe work between the valves?
2. Are the other 2 ends just cupped and sitting freely on the floorboards?

There was another rad in the bathroom which was removed and hence you can see 2 CH pipes are cupped.

Thanks

IMG_5240.jpg
IMG_5241.jpg
IMG_5242.jpg
 
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The chrome uprights ,on either side of the valves ,are likely to just be screwed to the floor. Can't see clearly in your pics of what is below floor level ,but appears to be a copper pipe going to each valve ?
 
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Yes copper pipes at each valve but were feeding another rad which was removed a while ago and they are capped.

It makes sense the chrome uprights are sitting on floorboards but don't think properly screwed because there's movement.

The main thing there are no connecting pipes between the 2 valves because I don't know why they put layers of skirting, like boxing or just decoration between the 2 valves?
 
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Not really sure what you are asking. If there were a pipe between the valves the radiators wouldn't work as the wster would take the shortest route.
Those types of rad are always wobbly btw.
 
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Are you referring to the big chunky timbers under the towel rail or the little bit of trim between the 2 valves?
If you put your hand under the floorboards you should be able to feel any pipework linking the 2 valves (possible but bizarre). Looking at the joist spacing it may be that your bathroom has been created by partitioning a large room off, the unsupported board ends would have been quite wobbly so someone put the big bit of wood across to mitigate that problem.
 
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If that is a towel rail then:
1. It may be brass or copper and run off the hot water secondary. Quite common in properties with (original) communal heating. Use a magnet to test if its steel. Unlikely to be aluminium as chromed. Will be on all the time (gravity circulation) unless the hot water cylinder is cold.
2. It may be on the hot water primary circuit whether its brass, copper or steel. Will come on if CH is off but HW is on and heating cylinder.
3. If its on the hot water secondary, only replace with another copper or brass, or stainless steel.
 
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Not really sure what you are asking. If there were a pipe between the valves the radiators wouldn't work as the wster would take the shortest route.
Those types of rad are always wobbly btw.
If there is any pipe work in the area indicated with black line, as I want to remove the white timbers layers in between.

rad1.jpg
 
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No there wouldn't need to be any. There may be a large gap in the flooring though. How far under, do the floorboards go ( the pieces you removed) ?
 
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I looked again on the left side, there is a joist with a notch for the CH pipe in the pic and can feel a nut assuming is for connecting CH pipe to rad valve.
There is missing floor board bits.
I guess the 3 layers of timber boards (see pic) are for decoration? and can be removed, put a new and redecorate?

rad2.JPG


rad3.jpg
 
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The only reason anybody would want to fit those timbers would be to cover up any eyesore or holes that lies beneath.
 
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What is the best way to remove the timbers, with minimal damage to the surrounding?

Or shall I remove all old fashioned timber cladding?
 
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Looks to me that the small Scotia bit by the pipework is hiding a cutout all the way to the back of the larger bit (and maybe a gap between large bit and skirting).
So, big screwdriver or thin pry bar to get the Scotia off, if the pipe holes are all the way through and there's a gap then big prybar between skirting and large bit, see where the fixings are and generally remove. If you have a jigsaw or a multitool you can use that the break the big bit down into little bits (if it's been skew nailed into the sides you may have to create a gap).
 
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Is it safe to start with a multitool in the area indicated in the picture, between valves? To remove the layers of timber then tackle the sides?

Thanks

rad4.jpg
 
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Hope you've got some spare blades :) . Just have a feel under that bit of timber, make sure there are no random bits of tube or cable under there
 
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