how much does a full bath of water weigh?

I

imamartian

...or what is the volume of a full bath of water?

reason i ask is because i want to seal my bath..(look out for further posts :eek:(.....) and i want to know if filling the bath with water is worth doing, or if i should put my 15stone in there instead...

I reckon the old notion of filling the bath with water, now is not relevant because the last 2 baths i have fitted have had quite sturdy metal brackets/legs and a wooden frame, so not much movement at all.
 
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No matter how sturdy your bath, a tub of water will cause the bath, legs and floor to move ever so slightly.. to calculate the weight, take the weight of the empty bath and add it to the volume of water in it, each litre weighs one kilo.. I suppose that you could use your own weight but you would have to stay in the bath 'till the sealant cures
 
I

imamartian

but that is my question.... what is the volume of your average bath?
 
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Kes

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You'll just have to take approx measurements up to your normal fill line, squaring the corners - use common sense. Ours is approx 4'6 x 2' x 7", which gives 5.25 cu ft. Multiply that by 62.36 lbs gives around 325 lbs (147 kilos).

I would get hoplessly lost if I tried to do it in metric. One cu metre is 1000 kilos, I think. Stupid system.
 
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Every pint = 1lb @ 4ºC
Every litre = 1Kg @ 4ºC

They used to reckon on a standard bath being 20 - 25 gallons so about 90 - 115 litres
I reckon on 250 -300Kg in total for a pressed steel or plastic bath full of water with a fat bloke like myself in it.
 
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Surely a pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter?

i.e. 1pint = 1.25lb and 1 gallon = 10 lbs

This is in the Uk, slightly different in the US
 
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but that is my question.... what is the volume of your average bath?

Hmm your original question was "How much does a bath of water weigh?" So what size is your bath? Is it a compact 1500mm or 1700mm with a shower bowl or a four person bath made from concrete and lined with mosaic? Details dear boy, details!

In the absence of any useful info, we can only really tell you how you can work it out for yourself
 
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Slugbabydotcom";p="873957 said:
Every pint = 1lb @ 4ºC
Every litre = 1Kg @ 4ºC

Our old teacher used to say :- A pint of clear water weighs a pound and a quarter. But I've never bothered to weigh it myself, so I',m just taking his word for it. :D
 
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You don't need to add the weight of the bather to the weight of water.

The bather will displace his own weight of water

unless he is so thin that he doesn't float


And yes, a pint of water weighs 20 ounces

A fluid ounce is a measure of volume, if you fill a 20-fluid-ounce container with pure water, that is the same as a pint and will weigh 20 ounces.

A pint of other liquids will weigh different amounts depending on their density, so a fluid ounce doesn't always weigh an ounce :eek:
 
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You don't need to add the weight of the bather to the weight of water.

The bather will displace his own weight of water

unless he is so thin that he doesn't float

Now I thought this would have come up sooner. I'm no scientist but in my thinking no water is being displaced anywhere simply supporting the additional weight of the bather although I appreciate I have given the water volume up to the average overflow line and therefore don't really need the bathers weight added to the calc.
Bath type Capacity to overflow
(litres)

Undersized, 1600mm primarily 165
Corner baths 140
Shower baths 250
Standard baths 225
Roll-top baths 205
Whirlpool/spa baths 225
Large outdoor spa baths 400
 

Kes

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You don't need to add the weight of the bather to the weight of water.

The bather will displace his own weight of water

unless he is so thin that he doesn't float
Well, if a bath-full of water weighs 150 kilos, and a 100 kilo body climbs into it, the total weight will be 350 kilos, no matter how much the water is displaced. Anyway, one's bum is always on the floor of the bath.
 
2

2scoops0406

You don't need to add the weight of the bather to the weight of water.

The bather will displace his own weight of water

No you won't you will displace your own volume of water. I don't really know the relative density of human to water, but I reckon as people tend to drown if they don't swim, then their density is slightly higher than water. Also, if you sit in the bath then it is your lower body that is submerged, this is generally an area dense in bone and muscle, ie, your legs and butt, so I say this bit was definitely denser.

So if you want the maximum weight in the bath, fill it with cold water, then get into said bath, then seal the edges :LOL: awkward cueing though as they say.

Anyhow to answer th original question, yes, you should fill the bath with cold water prior to sealing, let the sealent cure, let the water out. The main reason that this produces a better seal is that the normal state of the sealent is compression, rather than tension, and as such is less likely to detach from the wall or bath :D
 
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Well, if a bath-full of water weighs 150 kilos, and a 100 kilo body climbs into it, the total weight will be 350 kilos, no matter how much the water is displaced. Anyway, one's bum is always on the floor of the bath.

absolutely correct.

and while I'm on,

a US pint of water is 16 fluid ounces

a GB pint of water is 20 fluid ounces

therefore there are 8 GB pints in a GB gallon x 20fluid ounces = 160 fluid ounces,
divided by the number of ounces in a pound, 16

= 10

A uk/gb gallon of water weighs 10lb @ 4deg c ;)

the US or dry gallon is 0.85 of the UK Imperial wine gallon
 

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