How to install rad if existing pipes too close to wall

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Hi, I’m in the process or replacing 9 rads in our house. In one room on the first floor, the existing pipe centres are only 32mm from the wall (see pic below where I’ve lifted a bit of carpet). With my rad mounting brackets, I have the option of mounting it for pipes that are 45 or 60 from the wall. What is the best way to tackle this?

1. Lift the carpet, underlay, T&G chipboard (seems like a right PITA) and modify pipe work
2. Pull the pipes forward at a bit at an angle from wall, extend them vertically until they are also 45mm from wall, mount the rad with pipes going into valves at angle away from wall.
3. As I’m going from imperial to metric on the rad and the new one is 70mm less in width, it was going to need a TRV extension. I could instead extend the 15 pipes with two 90 deg bends at each end, and at the same time as I move towards the rads laterally, I could move away from the wall. Not very pretty...

Other ideas? How is this normally done? Thanks.

B2B43571-B251-4477-AA3D-CA8818895FE9.jpeg
 
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You've answered your own question I think, depending how tidy a job you want and how much work you want to do! Perfectionists would take the floor up and move the pipe as required. Otherwise, use the necessary bends to achieve correct pipe position. Dont advise trying to bend the pipe at an angle, all you'll achieve is to kink it, (and weaken it), lower down, and it'll probably look worse than just fitting a couple of elbows.


As you need to bring the pipework in closer together to suit the new rad width, I'd be taking the floor up and altering it underneath. Pipework outside the footprint of the rad I always think is vulnerable to damage, as well as looking unsightly.
 
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Thank you both. I think I’ll go for the slightly unsightly option of modifying pipework above the carpet. It’s only one room and frankly, compared to some other aberrations in this house, will be quite a minor offense. Two further questions:

1. When I solder the pipes and bends together above the floor (approx 80mm above carpet), is there a risk of melting joints that are below the floorboards and making them leak? I think the answer is “no” but is it considered prudent to say wrap the bottom of the pipe with a wet rag? What about burning the floorboards/carpet/underlay?

2. Along the same lines, can I do a fit of the pipes with flux, tighten the rad valves onto the pipes with the radiator in place and do my soldering last, without damaging the valves and olives?

Thanks.
 
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1. Depends how good (quick) you are with soldering. I'd wrap the bottom of the pipe with a wet rag "just in case", and also wet the underlay. A bit of scrunched up aluminium kitchen foil is quite good at keeping heat away from where it's not wanted. Protect the skirting board with a soldering mat.
2. No, you are likely to damage the valves, particularly any thermostatic one. Fit radiator, fit any extension, fit valves, measure up and cut / bend pipe work. Remove valves, solder in pipe work.

That pipe looks as if it has already been bent (badly) just above the floor surface. Also, the compression fitting onto the valve looks to have left a big dent round the pipe where the olive fits, so I wouldn't reuse that bit of pipe. You may find it quite difficult to bend / use fittings to achieve such a small difference. It might well be easier in the end to lift the floor and adjust the pipes underneath.
 
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How about drilling a 16mm hole in the floorboard directly in front of the pipes and you may be able to bring them forward enough.
 
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