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Impossible goal?

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Tiffany123, 22 Sep 2019.

  1. Tiffany123

    Tiffany123

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    My dream would be to have my own home built on at least 1 acre of land in a semi-rural area where I can then begin to keep a few farm animals (maybe 5 - 10). Ideally I'd like to be on the edge of a village rather than out in the open countryside.

    On researching, it seems to me that this is near enough impossible. Issue number one being that obtaining land with planning permission in a rural area is difficult but even when plots are available, they are significantly smaller than I'd be looking for, or they are plots with planning permission for multiple homes (& are priced as such).
    I have read that agricultural land can sometimes be built on if you can prove you need to be on that land for the animals you keep but I would be keeping animals for my own enjoyment & do not plan for them to provide any income so this would not apply to me.

    Are my only options either to buy agricultural land nearby other houses & hope that I somehow am granted planning permission (even though its unlikely), or to buy a plot with planning permission for multiple houses & pay the increased price?

    Any advice would be much appreciated as I am very inexperienced in this area!

    Thank you!
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    More cheese before bedtime might give you some different dreams.

    You've covered your options for agricultural land. There would be more potential for building on green belt land, but keeping animals may fall fowl of other regulations and neighbours.
     
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  4. If you see a suitable plot you could make an offer subject to obtaining planning permission, but the value of the plot will increase with planning permission of course. You don't have to own the land to submit a planning application as long as you give the owner notice following the correct planning procedure.
    Maybe look for an almost derelict building in a rural area that could be demolished and rebuilt as a new house.
     
  5. EddieM

    EddieM

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    How about a small holding in Wales / Welsh borders?
     
  6. noseall

    noseall

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    (titter)
     
  7. cdbe

    cdbe

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    Can't you buy the last house in the row and rent/buy some adjacent agricultural land. In the semi-rural areas near us there's a few examples (generally paddock type arrangements) where the house has a horse field next to it with fence and gate access from the garden.
     
  8. Nakajo

    Nakajo

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    'fowl' - like what you did there
     
  9. charliegolf

    charliegolf

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  11. charliegolf

    charliegolf

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    Was it obvious I was on a bung?:D
     
  12. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    so it may, but chickens wouldn't be the problem. It is not commonly known, but several cases bear out that the allotments act of 1950 ish as law overrides all covenants, landlords restrictions etc with regard to keeping chickens (or rabbits). If you own or lease land, you have an absolute right to keep these with the only proviso being they must not cause a statutory nuisance (which has a precise meaning in law)

    https://www.bhwt.org.uk/told-cannot-keep-hens/
     
  13. Notch7

    Notch7

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    My neighbour has chickens.

    I feel sorry for the poor things -every night the foxes are there circling the cage, licking their chops.
     
  14. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Does the Act apply to land which the person owns ? or does it only apply to land which has been allocated to the person for agricultural use.

    A covenant in the deeds of a house banning the keeping of any livestock in the garden was held to be effective by the courts.
     
  15. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    Last edited: 29 Sep 2019
  16. JohnD

    JohnD

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    The details of the case, and the evidence you provide (none) are not as convincing as mrrusty's
     
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