Is this a new circuit?

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Hi folks.
Is this a new circuit or merely a redirected one?
I need to run a new 6mm T/E cable to install a 7.3kw induction hob in place if current gas hob.
Current CU has an existing circuit with 32A breaker that used to go to an electric shower. The shower is long gone.
If I "redirected" this circuit by cutting the shower cable about 1 metre from the the CU and connecting it via a junction box to the new hob cable, does this count as a new circuit?
I think not, as I'm not going into the CU or changing any breakers...but!
It is is, however, new cable, running to a new appliance, in a new location.
All cables are/ will be 6mm T/E.
I intend to get a qualified spark to do the final wiring, so he can sign that bit of the job off, so as not to I validate my home insurance.

Running the cable to the hob will be a right PITA but will not required a skilled tradesman (shifting kitchen units)...which is why I'd rather DIY it.
 
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You may get the correct/better answer in the electrics part of the forum, although I get why you posted in the building regulations part.
 
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By removing the shower cable you are removing the circuit, so you can only be providing a new one for the cooker.

Blup
 
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There are ways to argue it is a new circuit and there are ways to argue it is not.

The definition of a circuit is:

"An assembly of electrical equipment supplied from the same origin and protected against overcurrent by
the same protective device."




However, cutting the cable as you have suggested would be extremely stupid.
 
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I intend to get a qualified spark to do the final wiring, so he can sign that bit of the job off, so as not to I validate my home insurance.

Why do you think connecting a hob would invalidate your home insurance? Never seen a clause like that and if there was I would find a different insurance company.
 
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Why do you think connecting a hob would invalidate your home insurance? Never seen a clause like that and if there was I would find a different insurance company.
Insurance companies will do all they can to ensure claims are correct.
Electrical work demonstrated to be incorrectly installed and without correct testing and documenting etc leading to a claim will be an exellent 'get out' for any insurance company.
 
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By removing the shower cable you are removing the circuit, so you can only be providing a new one for the cooker.

Blup
Several years ago I added an electric shower in my daughters house, there was a redundant hot tub circuit on 7/0.044" T&E, the end of which was pulled back and redirected, the person doing the testing and paperwork insisted on describing it as 'reused' rather than 'new'.
upload_2021-12-30_20-42-37.png
 
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It would be for the courts to deside. The 100 year old brush, had new heads, and new stales, but as long as not changed together still the old brush.

So who knows what was replaced and when?

But you know really a new circuit, but will only go to court if it kills some one.

There is unlikely to be a court case unless some one dies. So it hardly matters if it is or is not new, as without a death no one cares.
 
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Several years ago I added an electric shower in my daughters house, there was a redundant hot tub circuit on 7/0.044" T&E, the end of which was pulled back and redirected, the person doing the testing and paperwork insisted on describing it as 'reused' rather than 'new'.
View attachment 255742

Noted, but the installation as a whole is described as new in the right hand box.

Blup
 
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Noted, but the installation as a whole is described as new in the right hand box.

Blup
As there was a new circuit installed (Macerator), the addition is the shower room light (added to the secondary CU, which was dedicated to the Hot tub but now dedicated to new shower room).
I remember the 'which box to tick' discusssion well.
 
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It would be for the courts to deside. The 100 year old brush, had new heads, and new stales, but as long as not changed together still the old brush.

So who knows what was replaced and when?

But you know really a new circuit, but will only go to court if it kills some one.

There is unlikely to be a court case unless some one dies. So it hardly matters if it is or is not new, as without a death no one cares.
Really this is a bit moot, unless special part p involvement, as basically same testing/documenting involved for new or alteration.
 
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Hi folks.
Is this a new circuit or merely a redirected one?
I need to run a new 6mm T/E cable to install a 7.3kw induction hob in place if current gas hob.
Current CU has an existing circuit with 32A breaker that used to go to an electric shower. The shower is long gone.
If I "redirected" this circuit by cutting the shower cable about 1 metre from the the CU and connecting it via a junction box to the new hob cable, does this count as a new circuit?
I think not, as I'm not going into the CU or changing any breakers...but!
It is is, however, new cable, running to a new appliance, in a new location.
All cables are/ will be 6mm T/E.
I intend to get a qualified spark to do the final wiring, so he can sign that bit of the job off, so as not to I validate my home insurance.

Running the cable to the hob will be a right PITA but will not required a skilled tradesman (shifting kitchen units)...which is why I'd rather DIY it.
Speak to your electrician first, he is the one putting his name on the paperwork, he will design the new part and say what he is happy for you to do on his behalf.
 
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Why do you think connecting a hob would invalidate your home insurance? Never seen a clause like that and if there was I would find a different insurance company.
Even the worst of insurance companies will obviously not have a clause in their policies relating explicitly to the connection of a hob (or any other specific activity).

However, virtually any insurance policy (even from the best of companies) will contain vague catch-all clauses, relating to such things as 'taking reasonable steps to ensure that work done (or not done) in the property does not put it at risk'. It's therefore down to how the insurer decides/chooses to interpret and implement that in the case of a claim.
 
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By removing the shower cable you are removing the circuit, so you can only be providing a new one for the cooker.1
As I read it, the OP was not proposing to remove the entire cable but, rather, was intending to leave the MCB and the first metre or so of the existing circuit.

Are you suggesting that what was left (an MCB connected to metre or so of downstream cable) would not constitute 'a circuit'? If so, do you believe that one could install a new MCB feeding a short length of cable in an existing CU without that constituting a 'new circuit' (which, if it were, would be notifiable in England)?

Kind Regards, John
 

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