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Is this Japanese Knotweed?

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by RichTeaBiscuit, 6 May 2019.

  1. RichTeaBiscuit

    RichTeaBiscuit

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    I've used glyphosate to kill a lawn in a new build house we moved into in November last year (was weedy, house built on back garden of other houses).

    Today I've noticed shooting up from the ground on the dead bits, some red stemmed weeds. Is this Knotweed?

    IMG_20190506_124950.jpg IMG_20190506_125029.jpg IMG_20190506_125036.jpg IMG_20190506_124955.jpg IMG_20190506_125008.jpg
     
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  3. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    Last edited: 6 May 2019
  4. endecotp

    endecotp

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    More glyphosate should fix it.

    (What made you suspect knotweed?!)
     
  5. chalkywhite

    chalkywhite

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    Roundup contains glythosate I believe, but didn't Roundup have recent bad press? Is there anything else? I'm finding it's running in a battle between lawn and weed. Thanks
     
  6. cwhaley

    cwhaley

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    I had it all over the garden. In two borders I just put membrane and bark down which stopped all growth of it and in one border I just tackle it as it appears which isn't too much of a problem if you just combine it with your weekly garden maintenance.

    As for the lawn once you have a strong, thick lawn established the bindweed will struggle to establish. At least that's what I found.
     
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  7. chalkywhite

    chalkywhite

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    Cool, so I'll blast the lawn with glythosate product, then sew grass. Thanks
     
  8. Notch7

    Notch7

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    buy a litre of rosate 360 or gallop -its commercial strength, less than £15 delivered (from memory)

    for use in a sprayer dilute 25ml in 1 litre of water (so 1 litre of rosate will make 40 litres of commercial strength weedkiller)

    It is slow to react so dont be disappointed if it takes 4 to 6 weeks at this time of year.
    because of emerging seedlings etc, its worth doing 2 applications say 3 weeks apart.
     
  9. cwhaley

    cwhaley

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    I wouldn't recommend using glyphosate before sowing a new lawn.
     
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  11. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    I second cwhaley's advice.
    I wouldn't recommend using glyphosate at all in this scenario, it is completely unnecessary.
    Bindweed is a plant just like any other and needs light to grow.
    Using mulch of any kind whether it's a weed suppressant fabric or compost will smother the bindweed.
    Glyphosate is killing all the healthy grass as well and you are just setting yourself up for problems if you are continuously spraying it everywhere indiscriminately.
    You will create an environment where only the strongest pathogens can survive the constant onslaught of chemicals so don't wonder why, in the future, you can't grow anything you want to grow and only get plants you don't want that can withstand that constant abuse.
    If you have children and pets you will also be increasing their exposure to these mutagenic chemicals as well as yourself.
     
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  12. chalkywhite

    chalkywhite

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    Great write-up. I can cover the area in membrane, but for how long? When I moved an outdoor store box that has been sat on some of it to keep it down, I see all the white roots on the surface, I guess on their way to the light and parts that are uncovered?
     
  13. cwhaley

    cwhaley

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    I'd just put a membrane or sheet of tarp down -- it's a good suggestion. When you lift it you will see the bindweed roots yes but they're relatively easily removed and the important thing is there will be no shoots. If I lift the membrane in my garden I see lots of the white roots but I've not seen any bindweed shoot up there in 2 years. The bark on top is great as the birds love sifting through it for bugs.

    When you're ready to lay your new lawn (turf may be better) the grass will have a much better chance of establishing without much competition from weeds. Just some fish, blood and bone too which helps the lawn grow.
     
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  14. chalkywhite

    chalkywhite

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    Thank you Cwhaley and Hawkeye, then that's what I'll do. :)

    It's not just birds that like sitting through chipped bark.... so does the neighbors cat.... for the toilet. Doh! :)
     
  15. cwhaley

    cwhaley

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    Our two cats will only use our garden as their litter tray. It is a bit annoying but nothing I can do.
     
  16. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    ^ what he said
     
  17. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    Free compost :D
     
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