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I've a DeWalt D024K, SDS question?

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by twixx, 26 Nov 2018.

  1. twixx

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    Hey,

    I'm a 'sunday league' DIYer... I use a drill about twice a year. I have a DeWalt D024K. At the weekend I punched a hole from outside in, without any issues at all when using Hammer action. Prior to doing this, I had assumed this would be best achieved using an SDS drill, and as such I was looking at getting a cheap SDS, but not sure I need one.

    Does my drill fall into the same category (performance wise) as an SDS?

    I, perhaps incorrectly, thought an SDS drill was named as such due to its action. However, I'm now wondering if its simply down to the chuck?
     
  2. SammyInnit

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    It doesn't but if you're just DIYing you don't need one.

    The name SDS when applied incorrectly in place of "rotary hammer drill" is in reference to the SDS chuck system however, it does have its own benefits with performance as well as convenience.
     
    Last edited: 26 Nov 2018
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  3. JobAndKnock

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    SDS drills these days all use a pneumatic hammer mechanism whilst impact drills (such as the D024K) use a mechanical percussive mechanism. Even the smallest SDS drill can generally outperform impact drills by a factor of 2 or more in terms of drilling speed because the strength of the blow they deliver is far higher. It means that SDS and the larger SDS Max drills are ideal for drilling extremely dense concrete and the like, but for DIY purposes all this extra power and speed is really not a necessity.
     
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  4. twixx

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    Thanks guys, in the end, I got through brick and breeze without any issues, but useful to know the differences.

    Cheers!
     
  5. opps

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    20 years ago I moved in to a house that has rendered internal walls. At the time I only owned a 750w Metabo percussion drill. It would take me about 10/15 minutes and a lot of sweat to drill a 7mm by 50 mm deep whole. I even managed to bend/warp drill bits as they overheated.

    After we had the extension built I had the misfortune of wasting 30 minutes trying to drill in to what I later discovered was an engineering brick. I couldn't even leave a mark in the brick. I borrowed an SDS drill and it took just over a minute to drill the first hole.

    Your house sounds as though it has relatively soft bricks and given that you seldom drill holes, I agree with the others that buying a SDS would be over kill. However, if you ever need to (for example) drill into a concrete lintel to put up a curtain rail you will need to borrow/hire/buy one.
     
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