Joinery help please.

  • Thread starter carlosfandango1976
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carlosfandango1976

Hi,

Please can someone give me some assistance.

The dry lining which has been done with 25mm insulated plasterboard has brought the finished plaster level out, past the frame of the sash windows thus making a varying gap around the windows from between 10mm to 25mm (see pictures :-

http://www.photobox.co.uk/album/6879197

The gap is causing problems now it's time to fit the architrave round the windows. The only way I can see around it is to offer some wood up against the frame and plasterboard and mark the level down the wood and then rip it on my circular saw, the only problem with this is the varying level and the fact that the gap is not that thick and it will be difficult to rip in both respects?

I have probably answered my own question but I wondered if any body had any better ideas?

Thanks in advance.

Carlos
 
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well you have 4 reasonable choices ;)

remove an inch from the wall

remove a bit from the wall and the back of the archatrave

add to the frame to clear the "bumps"

or a bit off all the above ;)

although at the front edge the archatrave is only about 5mm thick [dependant on style]

so assuming your plasterboard is around 12 mm i would pad out the frame by a constant 20mm and remove the high spots from the plasterboard or if you have a router table remove 6mm 12mm wide from the outside edge of the archatrave
 
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It depends on what type of finish you are looking for. It looks like you have original sash windows and a nice bit of original victorian coving. So it would be a shame not to get it looking as good as you can. looks like you will have to make the best of a bad situation

Doing what you have suggested would leave you with an uneven line to fit your architrave against. Also you would be transferring the uneven gap onto wood and it would stick out like a sore thumb! Working on the largest part of the gap being 25mm. I would rip an infill strip to about 22mm and then rebate the architrave by 3 mm this would cover the 25mm gap and give you an even straight edge to fit architrave too. The problem then would be the architrave would be sitting away from the wall where the gap is only 15mm. This gap would need filling with something such as plaster. Better to have this gap against the wall and behind the architrave than around the edge of the window. The window would look symmetrical on all sides up to and including the architrave. As for the base of the window the gap will not be seen if you build in a wooden window cill.

I know what I want to say but explaining it in writing is not easy :confused:
 
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Carlos - why the difference, is it 'cos the box sash isn't sitting plumb in the wall? Test it with a spirit level. Is the plasterboard plumb - test it?

Solutions;

If the box sash is out-of-plumb move it to the vertical. These window frames are usually fixed by 4 - 6 large nails driven into wall levelling plates. With an alligator saw cut through the nails where they enter the wall, move loose frame so it's plumb. Re-fix to wall with frame fixings. You can do this by gaining access at the bottom through the sash-weight pockets and at the top bore a, say 15-20mm, hole through the inner jam lining. This 15-20mm hole allows you access to the outer jam for drilling into the wall, etc. Plug this 15-20mm hole when finished. With sand/cement mortar re-point the gap created outside. Then fix your timber gap closers & architrave.

If you can't do the above then fix some timber reveals to cover the gaps, plane level to plasterboard, re-fix architrave. The gap at the bottom will be covered by your bull-nosed window board.

Remember, that no, or very few, box sash windows were ever parallel or even with the plaster surface, so for that authentic look you may have to accept a less than perfect(modern!) look.
 
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carlosfandango1976

Thanks for all you replies.

I'm sure the plasterer could have done more to avoid this situation or at least keep the gaps constant, at least down one edge......
They are original sash windows and they are not 100% plumb, but if I'm honest I left it to the plasterer, but come 2nd fix I've realised I've got a problem. I've had the coving re-made from the original design. again another joy of restoration.

However, I do want to make it look good, as I cannot live with bodges.

Thanks again for all your ideas.

Regards

Carlos
 

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