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Keypads v fobs

Discussion in 'Alarms, CCTV & Telephones' started by sparkypenguin, 22 Oct 2021.

  1. sparkypenguin

    sparkypenguin

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    Hi all,

    Currently wiring my house with cables for a home alarm system and I was wondering what peoples thoughts were about the number of keypads that are required.
    In my current house I have 1 at the front door and 1 in the garage, these are the only 2 entry points and then another 1 on the landing for night setting, but at my new house there are 5 possible entry routes and then the landing, so 6 in total.
    I could probably get this down to 4 keypads if I were to restrict entry to the property.
    However now that fobs are available to turn alarms on and off do I really need multiple keypads?
    Also as the panel will be in the loft should I allow for a keypad next to it?

    Any thoughts appreciated. (y)
     
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  3. pcaouolte

    pcaouolte

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    One by the final exit door, one in the garage if you set that separately from the house, one on the landing for setting and un-setting at night (not strictly necessary but nice to have if a detector goes into alarm at night). Keypads for other doors are not usually needed because most people always leave/enter the home by the same door when they need to set or unset the alarm.

    A loft is a horrible environment for a panel. Very hot in summer, very cold in winter. The panel and the battery don't enjoy that. Usually it is possible to find a better place (built in cupboards are popular).

    Depends on the panel if you need a keypad near it. Some can be accessed with a laptop which avoids the need for a keypad nearby.

    Fobs are usually presented to keypads in order to set or unset the alarm so don't really reduce the number of keypads required.

    Apps are available for some panels that can set & unset the alarm.

    Keypads are often one of the most expensive components of an alarm system.
     
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  4. secureiam

    secureiam

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    You should limit the entry routes to your house to a minimum.

    I don't see the need for a keypad on most landings as there is a timer to get upstairs and the landing would be omitted when in the house?

    however a false alarm should be a rare event so the benefit of having one on landing is minimal.

    5 entry routes seems excessive but I cant comment on the layout or why you think there is a need to use all the entry points.

    Very large homes it may benefit from having sections/ areas, in which case having keypads in each section or area may be useful.

    radio fobs?
    radio fobs can be used but there are limitations on how they work. Keypads can offer more flexibility.

    lofts not the best place as above really.
     
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  5. sparkypenguin

    sparkypenguin

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    Thanks to both of you for the advice.(y)

    I think I did not explain myself correctly so sorry about that.:oops:

    When I said fobs I actually meant the type where you can arm and disarm by pressing a button, like a remote car key.
    Also I had forgotten about being able to use apps to arm and disarm.
    So given these advancements since my current alarm was fitted I am wondering how important the keypads actually are?
    And also when I said I had 5 entry routes I should have clarified that these are all potential entry routes, in practice I would only be using 2 or 3 of these 99.9% of the time.

    If remote keys / phone apps were NOT available then I would probably have:-
    1 at the main front door which will be the main entry/exit point
    1 at the side door which leads to the utility room which I was planning to use for entry with shopping etc but as this will mean unlocking a side gate so I am now thinking that it's not really an option I will ever take.
    1 in the garage as this will be part of the main alarm and as I have an electric door it will allow me to park my car and unset the alarm and enter the house via the internal garage door, hence not getting wet if it's raining.:)
    1 in the landing to allow part set of the alarm at night and the reason I would prefer it on the landing is that the hall PIR would sound the alarm immediately if triggered.
    1 beside the panel as from your comments this sounds like a good idea.
    But based on the fact that remote keys and phone apps are available then which of the 5 above are not required please?

    Unfortunately the location of the panel is now pretty much set in stone as 90% of my cables are already in place.
    What specific issues could I incur and are these mainly due to possible overheating / possible condensation and if so are these issues not generally related to older houses with no loft ventilation and hence high levels of moisture?
    But mine is a new build and the loft is a cold space loft that is very well ventilated so in theory no condensation should occur.
    I do have access to the loft via a 3rd floor walk in door and the panel is going to directly to my left so I could at least put the keypad in the non loft side of the door if that makes sense?

    Thanks again for your help. (y)
     
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  7. secureiam

    secureiam

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    In the summer loft spaces can get extremely warm / hot, the panels back up battery is likely to suffer the most. So if you are putting in a loft then you may want ensure air can circulate around the panel.
     
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  8. pcaouolte

    pcaouolte

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    You don't need the keypad on the landing as the PIR in the hall can be set so that it doesn't trigger the alarm immediately when the system is part set. This allows you to unset the system using the keypad by the front door.
    You don't need the keypad by the side door. You should aim to minimise the entry routes that you use when the alarm is set.
    You don't need the keypad in the loft, who wants to sit in a loft pressing keys. The physical checks on the panel can take place in the loft and any key pushing can take place in the comfort of the hall.
    Perhaps you can set up a radio fob to open the garage door and unset the alarm at the same time. This needs a bit of care to ensure that someone forcing the door open wouldn't disable the alarm.

    That's at least £300 saved. :)
     
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  9. DIYSOS2018

    DIYSOS2018

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    All the questions aside this sounds an absolute belter of a house :D
     
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  10. sparkypenguin

    sparkypenguin

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    Think I may have miscommunicated yet again:oops:, I actually want the hall PIR to sound the alarm immediately, hence the need of the landing keypad.


    Agreed! :D


    I assumed that a keypad near the panel would be useful when setting up the alarm as it would minimise the number of trips up and down the stairs.
    However I have no knowledge of how to set up an alarm so do you actually need to be near the panel when using the keypad to set up zones etc?


    I am going to have a PIR and contact for the garage.


    :D


    I will fix the panel to a board using polo's to ensure circulation. (y)


    Thanks.
    9 years in the building so far!;)
     
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