Lighting Circuit in Consumer Unit not protected by an RCD

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Hello - my sockets RCD tripped the other day and all sockets upstairs and downstairs went off - all well and good so far - but all the lights in the house were on , and I see in the (GE Euroline) CU that there is only one RCD trip and that is protecting the sockets only - the Lighting Circuit for upstairs and downstairs lighting circuits are only protected by 10a MCB's on each circuit. The house was built in 2008 - but regardless of reg's etc this dont sit comfortably with me that the lighting circuit does not run through an RCD of any sorts and just MCB's

The outside lights are linked up to the downstairs lighting circuit , I know only too well how a seal can leak or a grommet wear out and dampness can get into a fitting , I also have heard of people turning off light switches with wet hand getting a shock or if for some reason a light switch got condensated or wet and I dont much like the idea of an MCB just protecting the circuit with no provision for protecting someone touching a switch or light fitting without RCD protection .

Whats peoples view (not talking about official regs) - should lighting circuit be protected by RCD or RCBO's ?

If I were to go down road of protecting the lighting circuit would I be better replacing the 2 10a MCB's with 2 10a RCBO's or would I be best linking up the 2 x 10a existing MCB's in the CU to a 20amp RCD/RCCB? - (if you can give out that information)

Many Thanks
 
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When in 2008 was the property built and when was building approval given? As that could be a factor on what version of the regulations could be complied to.
Also what method of wiring has been used on the lighting circuit, if has been constructed in manner where the cable has been protected against mechanical damage, then RCDs can be excluded on a lighting circuit.
 
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When in 2008 was the property built and when was building approval given? As that could be a factor on what version of the regulations could be complied to.
Also what method of wiring has been used on the lighting circuit, if has been constructed in manner where the cable has been protected against mechanical damage, then RCDs can be excluded on a lighting circuit.

Thanks for reply - I dont really know when exactly in 2008 , was regs changed in 2008.

I am predicting the wires to light switches are in the white plastic conduit type stuff? - Is there any minimal impact of checking without hacking out plaster on wall to find out at all?
 
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am presuming that the regs that came in about not running the lighting circuit through an RCD any more is to do with maybe if trips and its night time/dark that you fall and hurt yourself? - or predicting that because you are not coming into contact with lighting circuit as much as if you were plugging in and out plugs into a 13a socket - then its not worth protecting the lighting circuit with an RCD? - is that why they changed the regs?
 
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I am predicting the wires to light switches are in the white plastic conduit type stuff? - Is there any minimal impact of checking without hacking out plaster on wall to find out at all?
White plastic capping does not constitute mechanical protection. If you have the installation certificate that should identify the cabling method and type. It should also inform you to what version of the regulations, the installation was agreed to comply to.
 
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White plastic capping does not constitute mechanical protection. If you have the installation certificate that should identify the cabling method and type. It should also inform you to what version of the regulations, the installation was agreed to comply to.

Thanks, - doubt if I would be able to get that, its a council house
 
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Hello - my sockets RCD tripped the other day and all sockets upstairs and downstairs went off - all well and good so far - but all the lights in the house were on , and I see in the (GE Euroline) CU that there is only one RCD trip and that is protecting the sockets only - the Lighting Circuit for upstairs and downstairs lighting circuits are only protected by 10a MCB's on each circuit. The house was built in 2008 - but regardless of reg's etc this dont sit comfortably with me that the lighting circuit does not run through an RCD of any sorts and just MCB's

The outside lights are linked up to the downstairs lighting circuit , I know only too well how a seal can leak or a grommet wear out and dampness can get into a fitting , I also have heard of people turning off light switches with wet hand getting a shock or if for some reason a light switch got condensated or wet and I dont much like the idea of an MCB just protecting the circuit with no provision for protecting someone touching a switch or light fitting without RCD protection .

Whats peoples view (not talking about official regs) - should lighting circuit be protected by RCD or RCBO's ?

If I were to go down road of protecting the lighting circuit would I be better replacing the 2 10a MCB's with 2 10a RCBO's or would I be best linking up the 2 x 10a existing MCB's in the CU to a 20amp RCD/RCCB? - (if you can give out that information)

Many Thanks

My lighting circuits are not protected by RCDs and it doesn't bother me. Don't know about the regs in your country but can say council houses are usually built to a high standard complying to the regs in force at the time.

Regarding your last question obviously two separate RCBOs would be the better option if your CU can take them.
 
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am presuming that the regs that came in about not running the lighting circuit through an RCD any more is to do with maybe if trips and its night time/dark that you fall and hurt yourself?
The harmonised regulations will not state that lights are not protected by RCDs, they will recommend that circuits are divided to prevent hazards/danger through lose of power. So that on most occasions will require circuits to be split across RCD devices or constructed in a manner that excludes the need for RCD protection.
The most common method is to have a consumer unit with dual (two) RCCBs/RCDs, then split circuits between them in the best way possible to prevent you from being without light, bare in mind a lamp can be plugged into a socket.
or predicting that because you are not coming into contact with lighting circuit as much as if you were plugging in and out plugs into a 13a socket - then its not worth protecting the lighting circuit with an RCD? - is that why they changed the regs?
The regs have not been changed and one of the reasons why socket circuits/outlets are covered is that appliances can be plugged into them and used outside, increasing the risk of harm.
The RCD regulations do not really cover the accessories on a lighting circuit (with the exclusion of bathroom equipment), but do cover the cable that is buried/enclosed within walls on the lighting circuit.
 
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Just to correct this thread - the installation in question must comply with ET101 (4th Edition as amended) - this is NOT a BS7671 installation. Lighting circuits do NOT need to be RCD protected (even with buried cables). However the bathroom lighting circuit must now be RCD protected - and must not share a circuit with non-bathroom lighting. However all work in the distribution work is Restricted Electrical Work, and as such it is illegal for anyone other than a Registered Electrical Contractor (REC) - i.e. a member of RECI (the Register of Electrical Contractors of Ireland) (also known as the Safe Electric scheme) to carry out this work.
 
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