Lining paper onto lime plaster

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Hi all,

Just redecorating a bedroom in a 1920's house with lime plaster. I've taken down the old wallpaper, filled and sanded the worst of the large holes/cracks, and then looking to put 1700 lining paper onto the walls, as the lime plaster isnt in very good condition. My question is do i need to do any additional prep to the lime plaster walls before lining them? pva them? As worried the lime plaster will absorb some of the paste and cause problems.

Many Thanks
 
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PVA over any kind of plaster is a bad move. When wet it becomes soft.

Lime plaster is a rather contentious subject. I tend to work in houses built circa 1900. Many have the original horse hair plaster. Those walls have been painted over with latex/vinyl paints for the last 40+ years, and no problems.

As a decorator, my advice would be to apply a "size" coat (read: diluted powder based wallpaper glue coat). It will reduce the suction level of the old plaster. Once dry use full fat paste.

After apply the dilute coat, once dry, use 120+ grit paper to sand the wall. It will dislodge any bits of grit without ripping the surface of the size coat.

I would recommend using a roller to apply the paste to the lining paper whilst it is on the lining table. You end up with uniform coverage. Then use a vinyl smoother to run the lining paper down the wall. Excess glue will be squeezed out and you should be able to ensure that their ar no air bubbles.

I stopped using pasting brushes about 20 years ago.
 
Why cause extra work, no need to size, use Wallrock fibreliner cross line 1m sheets, long pile roller sleeve and use Wallrock ready mix paste simply paste the wall and hang. Then paint
 

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Over lime plaster use lap cold water paste. You need it breathable so not to trap moisture
 
Wallrock is a breathable system and as it’s a 1920s house then it will have a cavity wall and all the breathable scaremongering isn’t needed on these properties
 
Also the fibres in the paper strengthen the wall so will be the best option in the long run, I’m one room I didn’t fancy taking it back so there were some hollow sections I did a quick job of filling and not taking out, 2 years later still like the day it went up look into it
 
You can look at outside brick pattern to see if house has a cavity or not
 
Why cause extra work, no need to size, use Wallrock fibreliner cross line 1m sheets, long pile roller sleeve and use Wallrock ready mix paste simply paste the wall and hang. Then paint

I have never used the stuff.

I tend to use 1000g lining paper, in part because it is 3 times cheaper to buy and I spend the time required to prep (fill/sand the wall).

Perhaps I should try wallrock, especially if it saves me prep time. When I first noticed that it is 55cm, I groaned given that pasting tables are 56cm wide, then I noticed that is a paste the wallpaper.

On older victorian walls, I would probably be inclined to size the walls. Sanding original victorian plaster can lead to bits of grit being pulled out of hairline cracks. The size can be lightly sanded to dislodge those bits of grit, meaning that when you roll the wallrock paste, you don't need to worry about the roller pulling out bits of grit.

When it comes to trimming the edges, do you brush a bit of paste on to the back of the paper to make it more pliable?
 
You can look at outside brick pattern to see if house has a cavity or not

True. If you see a full brick, next to a half brick, next to a full brick, then it is very likely to be a solid 9" wall.
 
sizing is the best way but last 3 rooms I didn’t have size one time so did without and had no issues and since then no issues as when I x line it rolls out nicely, but with the 1m lengths you only get 1 join below the picture rails, I have had a couple of times has issues with grit where I hadn’t hoovered the walls sufficiently. I have a couple of bits on the room I showed you which I am going to cut around this time and skin with toupret and a fine rub down with 400/240. Normally I get a flat plastic card and tap them out before painting. Literally just trim the pieces 20cm longer and get the lining on the wall paste brush lightly no need to over brush it then wet damp sponge down the corners a couple of passes caressing into the corner then a long steel ruler or can be done free hand a small while later with a snap off knive snapping regular on each cut. Once dry a thin bead of caulk doen the edges and quick swipe down with wet finger and good to paint. Once u get the paper in position for the first couple of feet correctly it sljust rolls out but be careful to make sure you get the paper on the right way. Also on a couple of jobs have struggled to get the butts up nicely as been awkward locations such as behind a curved rad in a window so toupret filler rubs doen like a dream can be used and fine sanding you can’t even tell once the Matt emulsion goes on, I still have to prep it same as yourself, sanding and filling it’s not magic solution to that.
 

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Nice example if cross lining below picture line in most old properties straight across the rail the cut the bottom one 20cm longer on skirting and into corners you can get nice butt joint across then wet the corners and top of skirt give it 2/3 mins then brush into place and press into corners then trim with knife once painted looks better than plastered walls if prep is done right
 

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sizing is the best way but last 3 rooms I didn’t have size one time so did without and had no issues and since then no issues as when I x line it rolls out nicely, but with the 1m lengths you only get 1 join below the picture rails, I have had a couple of times has issues with grit where I hadn’t hoovered the walls sufficiently. I have a couple of bits on the room I showed you which I am going to cut around this time and skin with toupret and a fine rub down with 400/240. Normally I get a flat plastic card and tap them out before painting. Literally just trim the pieces 20cm longer and get the lining on the wall paste brush lightly no need to over brush it then wet damp sponge down the corners a couple of passes caressing into the corner then a long steel ruler or can be done free hand a small while later with a snap off knive snapping regular on each cut. Once dry a thin bead of caulk doen the edges and quick swipe down with wet finger and good to paint. Once u get the paper in position for the first couple of feet correctly it sljust rolls out but be careful to make sure you get the paper on the right way. Also on a couple of jobs have struggled to get the butts up nicely as been awkward locations such as behind a curved rad in a window so toupret filler rubs doen like a dream can be used and fine sanding you can’t even tell once the Matt emulsion goes on, I still have to prep it same as yourself, sanding and filling it’s not magic solution to that.

Thanks.

Good point about the 1m rolls.

I will consider using it the next time a customer want the walls lined.
 

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