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Lofty whole home ventilation system - any good?

Discussion in 'Building' started by kevin_robson, 12 Nov 2007.

  1. leech

    leech

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    Hello to everyone,

    I have a terraced 3 bedroom property built in 1910 and it suffers from black marks on the upstairs ceiling (mould) i think and also definite mould growths on the walls and behind furniture upstairs.

    I have come across the positive pressure ventilation systems on the market such as the lofty etc. and am not sure which one is the best one to go for. The price differences between the product are also confusing i.e. why one product is more expensive than the other and whether a higher price means better perfformance or not??

    In my research I have shorlisted 2 items as follows:
    the lofty at £370 from breathingspace.co.uk
    or
    the drimaster from nuaire at either £258.00 for the basic model or £293 for the drimaster 2000 model from condensationproducts.co.uk.

    does anybody have any suggestions/experiences with either product or similar issues that they wish to tell me or help me with in my choice.

    Also if anybody knows where to get the items for chepaer than the prices i have found that would also be appreciated

    Cheers

    Leech.

    i would very much appreciate any help.
     
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  3. bevchris

    bevchris

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    I have a three bedroom semi which is totally with out any vents besides trickle vents on windows. If I cook a roast with veg or run a hot bath all my downstairs windows steam up.
    Is the Lofty the solution. I don't want all the mess and dirt of installing vents in all the rooms. Hope someone can advise.
    Bevchris
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Installation is subject to a survey, and some vents may be required to allow the system to work.

    Also, you may still require an extract fan in the kitchen
     
  5. bevchris

    bevchris

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    Who carries out the survey. I was told of this product by a builder carrying out work for a neighbour. He hadn't seen my house but advised me on what I had told him. I haven't got damp or mildew anywhere, I just feel my house would be fresher and I wouldn't have to open doors and windows to let out the steam. It's as though the air can't hold the steam from the cooking and the kitchen cupboards run with the condensation. Only other problem is condensation on bedroom window when nights are cold. I really don't want the bother of vents as I have only just spent a fortune on retiling floors and replastering walls.

    Thanks, Bev
     
  6. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The supplier of the unit does the survey, and makes recommendations as part of the installation. The unit must be installed as per their recommendations
     
  7. bevchris

    bevchris

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    Thanks Lofty

    I planned on buying it via the internet so who would survey in this case?
     
  8. bevchris

    bevchris

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    Sorry Woody

    Please excuse me calling you Lofty. I think it's my age. Get confused easily! I would apreciate a reply to question.

    Bev
     
  9. leech

    leech

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    Further to my original post above in which I posed a few questions, I am here to add some more input.

    Unfortunately nobody gave me an answer to the questions I asked above and therefore on the basis of my own research, I took the plunge and bought a Drimaster from Nuaire, direct from their own outlet called 'fans direct' which sells their products directly to the public. (www.fansdirect.co.uk)

    The total cost of the basic Drimaster inc. vat and next day delivery was £228.85. My research found that this price is more or less the cheapest on the net. Please note that (preservationsupplies.co.uk do sell the item for £5 less inc) however in my view the price difference is so small that I thought it better to go directly to the manufacturer, in case I have any after-sales issues a few years down the line as there’s a 5 year guarantee, and I think the manufacturer will be better placed to deal with these.

    You may be wondering why I went for the Drimaster over the lofty, there were a few reasons, including the price difference. (Lofty costs around £370, Drimaster £228).

    The Drimaster' filters only need replacing after 5 years, the Lofty's after 2 years.

    The lofty is made by a very small company, whereas the Drimaster, by a very large and well established company ‘Nuaire’ with numerous other products. I felt if I had after-sales problems a few years down the line I would probably get a better response from Nuaire. Both fans come with a 5 year warranty.

    According to the manufacturer, the lofty has been around for about 10-12 years. Here is the Lofty manufacturer’s website http://www.dryhomecondensation.co.uk/. Drimaster has been around for 20+ years around the world, and if you do a search on Google you will find it is used in Canada, new Zealand etc. The Drimaster is also used by many housing associations in bulk for their housing stocks in the UK.

    The only advantage I think the lofty has over the Drimaster is that the fan speed control on the Lofty is on the outside louver, whereas on the Drimaster it is on the actual unit inside the loft. However once the Drimaster is installed you should never have to adjust the fan speed anyway as it comes on and off by itself.

    Installation is very easy, cut a hole in the upstairs hallway, attach the louver to the ceiling with supplied screws, the louvers top protrudes into the loft, in the loft attach the flexi pipe to the louver by tie clip supplied, hang the unit with string supplied, then the hardest part is the wiring, which I got an electrician to do, he charged me £50 for making the connection to the mains, and job done. I was quoted between £500-600 for the same job by damp proofing contractors.

    Since I have installed the Drimaster I feel a fresh blast of air as I go up the stairs, I cannot say at present whether it has got rid of the mould problems because I’ve only had it in for 2-3 weeks, and the windows are open all day due to it being summer now; the real test will be in winter 2009 when the windows are shut – I will see whether the mould reappears. Watch this space!!
     
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  11. naepace

    naepace

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    Hi, I've been reading as much about as 'loft' positive pressure ventilation systems as I can. My concern about these units is how noisy they may be. They all claim to be near silent & yet I have had many aquarium pumps make the same claim yet sound more like having the M25 going through your livingroom :LOL:
    Can anybody give their experience ?
    Cheers in advance.
     
  12. Clare184

    Clare184

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    Hi,
    Wondered if you could share your views on whether you think the system has worked. I have been toying with the idea of getting something like this for 2 years and still haven't taken the plunge. Please could you (or anyone) out there help me and tell me if they have any first hand experience. Thanks.
     
  13. leech

    leech

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    Hi,

    In answer to your question about whether the loft fans work, i would say i wish i had bought one sooner!!!

    since having it fitted the house does not smell damp and mouldy anymore, the mould has stopped growing on the walls, ceilings, behind wardrobes and on clothes, i have had the lofty for almost a year now, i.e. this is the 1st winter it has gone through (which is when the condensation problem used to be at its worst) this year we don't have any condensation problem.

    this is thanks to the nuaire drimaster -

    i bought that rather than the 'lofty' as the drimaster is made by a very large and well known manufacturer and has been sold worlwide for the last 20 or so years.

    If you have mould and a damp smell in your house then this is for you,

    cheapest way is to buy it online direct from nanufacturer via the link in my post above, then have it installed by any electrician its really easy,

    you can hardly hear the fan in operation, i actually have to listen out to hear it.

    hope this helps - leech
     
  14. Clare184

    Clare184

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    Thank you so much for your reply - you have really helped me in making a decision - I have just ordered one so fingers crossed, once it's up and running, my mouldy clothes will be a thing of the past - once again, a big THANK YOU.
     
  15. davebwithane

    davebwithane

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    Hello Leech

    Thanks for writing about these ventilations systems. I am on the verge of buying one. One question I have is, is your loft totally insulated ie. the loft floor and roof ? I believe they work off the air that is currently sitting in your loft and I believe (may be wrong) that the air temperature in the loft needs to be a certain temperature. Any idea if that is correct ? We don't have any felt or insulation on the actual roof.

    Which model did you go for ? the 2000 or 350 or something else ..

    Thanks

    Dave
     
  16. davebwithane

    davebwithane

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    Hi
    Update on the nuaire drimaster.

    I bought one recently. It requires a huge hole in your ceiling into the loft approx. 22cms. I got an electrician to wire it up. It is quiet. It's been up and running for 2 weeks now. The condensation has gone down, but this could be due to the weather as it has been a bit warmer recently. Last night was cold outside though and there was condensation on our windows this morning in 1 of the bedrooms. No where near as much as there was in the winter. When passing the outlet on the stairs it is blowing some very cold air around the place ie. what is in the loft. There is no insulation in our loft.

    Cheers
    Dave
     
  17. noseall

    noseall

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    If you are noticing high levels of condensation when it is very cold outside and less when it is warm, then this nothing to with the addition of a venting system.

    It is simply the fact that external temperatures dictate when condensation will be most prolific.

    We open our windows a lot. This seems to work rather well. :rolleyes:
     
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