1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

MIG Welder?

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Chud, 29 Jan 2019.

  1. Chud

    Chud

    Joined:
    6 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    692
    Thanks Received:
    57
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Folks any recommendations on a cheap gas/no gas MIG welder?

    I know Lidl have a parkside flux cored machine in at the moment for £80 but it can't use gas (without a different gun) and from what I've read may struggle with thinner materials compared to a gas MIG machine.
     
  2. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    19,502
    Thanks Received:
    3,762
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    For sure, like everything else you get what you pay for.
    This machine will stick pieces of metal together I guess but it really depends on what you have in mind fabrication wise......I doubt if it would do more than 2mm and even that, not very readily.
    A more sophisticated and controllable machine makes for easier welding, if you are a beginner.
    John :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  3. Chud

    Chud

    Joined:
    6 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    692
    Thanks Received:
    57
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks John, yeah I've no doubt the Lidl machine will stick metal together and I'm happy to have a machine that'll do flux-cored but I'd like the potential to add a gas bottle and get a better finish and have more flexibility in what it can do...I'm a total novice at the moment but don't really want to be in the situation of wanting/needing to buy another welder if I can get a half decent budget one first time that'll do both.
     
  4. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

    Joined:
    3 Nov 2006
    Messages:
    21,533
    Thanks Received:
    1,967
    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Doesn't MIG = Metal Inert Gas ? In which case gasless welding could not be MIG welding
     
  5. Chud

    Chud

    Joined:
    6 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    692
    Thanks Received:
    57
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    With 'Gasless' AFAIK the gas comes from the flux in the weld wire, the result is not as neat as 'proper' MIG but does have some advantages also.
     
  6. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    19,502
    Thanks Received:
    3,762
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That's basically it....an arc welder with an 'endless' electrode, if you like.
    It is more controllable than the stick welder, presumably because of the type of flux used and its advantage only comes when there are draughts about which disperse the argon/CO2 gas or whatever. You can counteract this to a certain degree by turning the gas pressure up, but that then cools the weld (n)
    A cheap welder may also have a 'live' torch which causes the wire to stick to the job before you are ready, if you're not careful.
    So.....if you are looking at thin metal (2mm say) than a MIG is for you- if you are thinking of fabricating farmyard gates then an arc welder could suffice.
    I'd go for a standard MIG with a current rating up to 140 amps and then you have the best of both worlds.....plus an auto darkening helmet of course!
    Machine Mart can fix you up, together with disposable gas cylinders and all of the necessary connectors.
    John :)
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  7. It's still a method of ARC welding. I think gasless is associated with MIG as it's the same method, a feed wire arc welder however as you know it's flux cored rather than using gas for shielding.

    The actual term is just that, flux cored arc welding; or FCA.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux-cored_arc_welding

    I think many people will say both have their benefits but prefer gas shielded. FCA has benefits when working somewhere that weather can interfere with the gas supply but most suggest a better joint is achieved with a gas shield.
     
Loading...

Share This Page