Move gas cooker leads to ventilation issue

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by RrogerD, 21 Oct 2021.

  1. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Currently have a freestanding gas cooker in a small kitchen. The 'outside' door and adjacent window lead to a 'lean-to' type utility area. This in turn has an external door and openable window but are rarely open.

    The property has currently been passing it's annual gas safety checks.

    However, I am wanting to move the location of the cooker by about a metre, meaning that a new / extension of the gas supply will be needed. Unfortunately though the plumber says that he won't be able to do this as it will invoke current regulations saying that ventilation must be to an outside space and not to another 'room'. One would assume that this utility area would be classed as another room.

    Is he correct?

    Is there any way around this? Presumably to have an extractor to vent to the outside? But how do we ensure that this is always on whenever the gas hob or oven are in use?
     
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  3. picasso

    picasso

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    If your kitchen is larger than 10 cubic metres you dont need more ventilation (for combustion) the outside door / window is building regs and can be complied with by using a normal kitchen extractor, is does not need to be linked to the cooker as its expected that the user will use it to clear cooking smells ect.
     
  4. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Found this:
    Is this saying that it's OK as long as I have a door in each (mine are normal size) and a trickle vent in each room?
    Screenshot_20211021-190548_Drive.jpg
     
  5. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Kitchen is larger than 10 cubic metres. Currently no extractor fan.
     
  6. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    Extractor fan can not be considered for combustion ventillation in your case
     
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  8. picasso

    picasso

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    Yes if you can comply with the dimensions, a ducted extractor fan would be easier and more effective at providing purge ventilation.
     
  9. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Although it would appear that I do not need an extractor fan of any means, surely?
    For smells etc, a room re-circulation fan could be used. For the removal of combustible materials / gases, the ventilation via trickle vents and the occasional opening and closing of the doors would appear to be sufficient as per the diagram above?

    I don't want to go down the 'external ducted fan' route really as it would be a right headache (cooker to be on internal wall; terraced house adjacent; bedroom above kitchen and bathroom to the right of kitchen).
     
    Last edited: 22 Oct 2021
  10. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    At least have a Carbon Monoxide alarm in the room where the gas oven is.

    A trickle vent can only allow fresh air into a room is there is someway for the stale air to leave the room.
     
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  11. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    I suspect that we're being overly cautious. The kitchen door opens to the hallway and front door and the other side, to the bathroom so, unless the habitants intend locking themselves in and sealing all windows and doors, there's always going to be a fresh blow through of air.
     
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