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Multi Trade/Carpentry?

Discussion in 'Trade Talk' started by kaseryn, 23 Feb 2018.

  1. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    I've been a shuttering chipppy for the last 15+ years and have had enough of it. I've always wanted to do nicer work with good finishes and the cold is creeping into my bones so i want to get myself a job as a multitrader, preferably with the emphasis on carpentry.. Can i get a few tips on how best to make the move? I've set my stall out this last week honestly i.e. not fabricating a work history on CV and stating my case as having an eye for detail, being keen as mustard and being fairly competent with finish carpentry, tiling and basic plumbing. I've been submiting a lot of applications along these lines and havent had a sniff so is it a case of having to blag it to get a foot in the door? I know i'll have plenty to learn on the interior joinery but i'm a good study and will enjoy it. Also.. whats the situation there for tools? Is everyone cordless for everything bar the sds or would you still have a few corded tools.. and would you go 110 or 240v?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    Also, can anyone give me an idea of what an essential starter kit might look like?
     
  3. Hot&Cold

    Hot&Cold

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    Many companies that contract for councils often have vacancy's for multi trade operatives,if you can do plastering it helps :)
     
  4. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    A combination of it being the start of the years a=combined with the collapse of Carillion means it has been a quiet start to the year for many people

    Corded? Cordless? In my world I need both - site setup, mobile snagging, end of job finishing when there is no mains power, I need cordless - rest of the time it's a mixture because there are still quite a few things you can't do with a cordless tool. I'd recommend you go 110 volt because whilst dragging transformer around when you are on private jobs is a balls ache (on bigger jobs there's pretty much 110 volt everywhere supplied by the main contractor, at least during the main part of the contract), having only 230 volt tools will automatically bar you from any and every medium to large site in the country - together any site run by a large contractor, HAT, property management company (larhe shopping malls, etc), council, etc The HSE enforce this, so there's no getting out of it. That means if you go 230 volt you'll only ever be able to work private domestic jobs. BTW I'm cordless for the SDS - an 18 volt brushless Makita has been man enough for everything I've done in joinery terms for the last 3 years. including putting in 10 x 3 wall plates onto resin anchors in stone walls. Starter kit depends on who you are working for to an extent
     
  5. Notch7

    Notch7

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    The catch 22 always stays the same!

    You need experience under your belt to get the job but cant gain the experience without the job!

    Have you considered becoming self employed and or working in the domestic sector rather than new build / commercial?

    It sounds like you would welcome the challenge and job satisfaction of fitting high class interiors. Fitted furniture for example, bedrooms, studys, AV walls, kitchens etc.

    I run a joinery shop in Sussex and local carpenters that do this sort of work in customers homes are very much in demand.

    Surprisingly most of the carpenters I meet use 240v. I do wonder though if the CDM will start to force the change to 110v on domestic projects.
     
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  6. big-all

    big-all

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    whats it got to do with cadburys chocolate :D
     
  7. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    A lot of what i've been applying for fit that description but no bites so far. That's what gave me the idea really.. they did the bathrooms and kitchens here a little while back as part of the decent homes programme and i had to keep butting in the prevent the fitter taking crappy shortcuts. They downed tools over xmas with just the carcases and worktops in and my integrated units had arrived (fridge, freezer, elec oven, gas hob) so put them in and finished it myself which was just as well as parittions were circa 30mm out and hardly a plumb/level plane to be found throughout. It was that and their foreman telling me i should think about trying it that got me thinking.
     
  8. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    Ahhh right. I didn't consider the impact of Carillion (which doesn't affect our game so much). Good shout thanks on the voltage so I may as well stick to 110v as default for corded. I already have the transformer and my sds is 110 anyway but it's gonna take me a while to build up a proper toolkit so i was thinking prob a couple of cordless drills, corded skillsaw and jigsaw to get me started? I had all these way back but flogged them off in lean times. Starter kit wise i'm sure there's a bit of an art to having a concentrated package of little bits and bobs to get you out of trouble when you dont have a van chock full of gear. Like all the lads you see on the tube/bus with the stanley wheelies..
     
  9. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    Indeed, such is my quandry. Twas ever thus and for sure i've helped a ton of boys coming the other direction into shuttering. Regarding type of work etc. i do very much enjoy the good finish but am not good/experienced enough to go my own at that level. I've got a lot to learn and need to build up a good power/hand tool/knick knack arsenal. I'm happy to do installs or repairs in either domestic or commerical settings. Whatever comes up really as long as its the right fit.. working in a workshop really would be the dream though! Every tool you could want to hand and wood wisdom to burn :)
     
  10. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    Big-All .. you lost me mate.. milk tray? :)
     
  11. Notch7

    Notch7

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    CDM :ROFLMAO:
     
  12. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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  13. big-all

    big-all

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    only works if your an old git like me :D

     
  14. kaseryn

    kaseryn

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    Ah i remember the packaging but not the ad :) So.. i guess i'll have to sell myself as more seasoned and jump in the deep end. Get run a few times till i can fake it well enough...
     
  15. noseall

    noseall

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    I began in the trade as a labourer and progressed into a fully fledged brickie. Gained a fair bit of experience plastering, hanging doors, carcassing etc.
    It was only when I went self-employed (gaffer retired) that I really started to knuckle down and learn other trades. I taught myself how to build roofs (and tile them in), mainly due to not wanting to go hunting for chippies who weren't too busy with their own stuff. The same with digger driving.

    As said, the process is kinda catch-22. but it all starts with you putting yourself out there.

    Get yourself a nice big sliding compound chop saw and bench and start from there.(y)

     
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