Nest Doorbell: No such thing as a 12-24v wired doorbell?

Joined
22 Nov 2017
Messages
55
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
I've bought a Nest Hello Doorbell and upon investigating our current set-up, my supposedly 'wired' doorbell is battery powered. I still want a regular (preferably traditional mechanical 'hold down the button' to ring) doorbell, so am looking at replacing what I currently have with something that is Nest compatible.

Nest says it requires 12-24v providing 8va. Almost all of the doorbells I've found however operate at 8v. It is this some strange quirk of UK doorbells? Or am I reading things incorrectly? Any specific links warmly received.

I'm assuming that as part of my installation I'll need a transformer to go from Mains -> 12-24v. What would be the usual way of installing this? Does it go straight into the fuse-box? I don't have a plug close to the front door, and certainly not one that could also happily hide a transformer box. The fusebox is under the stairs though, and running a length of thin 12-24v capable wire would be relatively easy.

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
hello mate

I am a Nest pro installer and I feel your pain!

I also bought a nest for myself which I have a wired door bell. But the make of my door chime is not supported by Nest.

Nest do recommend more than 8v, however depending on the length of the cable from door bell to the button , it might work ok.

I have a Byron 776 doorbell with built in transformer. It is not a supported transformer by Nest, but it works fine for my install. It is an 8v transformer

Nest don't recommend using door bells with built in transformer and always want to put an external transformer because of this very reason.

Look on tool station, and the door bell is about £12 from them. You can try that and see how it works. failing that, a new transformer and a separate bell will work out about £25 and then you have to run cables to it and ...

You option for the transformer is up to you. You can either get a din rail mountable one and put it inside your CU, depending on space, or get one and mount it outside the fuse box. You need main to the transformer, and then a cable from transformer to the door chime and a cable from chime to the door bell.

Hope this helps.
 
I’ve been doing research last week.
Apparently the pro version must have 24v

However and hopefully the lower models eg 2, require less voltage as it only charges the battery.
 
Sponsored Links
Nest only do a single version of door bell. There is no pro and ... , they also don't do any sort of plugin transformer.

You are thinking about Ring door bells
 
0F33DD41-83DF-4618-864C-6F3D5ACE4970.png
 
Sorry to wake this thread finding it hard to find a chime for the nest hello. Have the above transformer module from Bg that can supply 8,12 or 24 volts , obviously nest hello doorbell works fine on this but issue comes with the chime.

Honeywell have a chime but will only take up to 16v. Lots of people just stay put 24 v through the transformer to the nest and Honeywell chime but I am concerned?

Any recommendations on chime and setup with the nest doorbell.

Thanks
 
Sorry to wake this thread finding it hard to find a chime for the nest hello. Have the above transformer module from Bg that can supply 8,12 or 24 volts , obviously nest hello doorbell works fine on this but issue comes with the chime.

Honeywell have a chime but will only take up to 16v. Lots of people just stay put 24 v through the transformer to the nest and Honeywell chime but I am concerned?

Any recommendations on chime and setup with the nest doorbell.

Thanks

Last year, my customer asked me to connect his nest hello to a Honeywell chime (HONEYWELL DW915S).

His electrician had tried, failed and gave up.

From memory, I used the 12v supply on the transformer.

The chime is not officially supported by Google but I found wiring advice on the web.

I may be doing some work at the house tomorrow or sunday. I can make a note of the wiring if you want (assuming that you have the same chime).
 
Thanks for the reply opps. A friend has been running 12 volt from the transformer to a d117 Honeywell and it's been working fine he advises. Thank you for the offer for looking though.


Sorry for the noob question but on the transformer as the picture does it matter which way the live and neutral wire go into the transformer block as the red lines. Does polarity matter here? Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20220527-201025~2.png
    Screenshot_20220527-201025~2.png
    536 KB · Views: 581
Thanks for the reply opps. A friend has been running 12 volt from the transformer to a d117 Honeywell and it's been working fine he advises. Thank you for the offer for looking though.


Sorry for the noob question but on the transformer as the picture does it matter which way the live and neutral wire go into the transformer block as the red lines. Does polarity matter here? Thanks

It makes no difference which way the live and neutral go.

You will need an enclosure to put it in though.

On another job were the customer has a ring door bell, his builder's electrician just screwed the transformer to the wall...


transformer.jpg
 
Oh and the reason I offered to show you the wiring is that the DW915S uses 3 inputs. If yours only has two inputs it should be straight forward.
 
Screwfix do a din rail transformer (BG) for £9. I think they have 8/ 12/ 24V options.

Edit: Can't believe I'm late to the party again!
 
Hi any thoughts on this. I have wired up the ding dong chime which is 8-16 v rated to the nest.

Using the transformer at 12 volts the nest works however the chime doesn't ring.

However using the transformer at 24v the chime works and he nest works.

Any idea why the doorbell will only work at a higher voltage? ( Which is above spec)

Thanks
 
Have you measured the voltage? It could be the loading if the Nest is pulling the voltage down.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top