New £20 note.

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IIRC, you can exchange cash at the bank.
Although someone walking in with their pantaloons held up with braces, pushing a wheelbarrow - full of purplebacks, might arouse a degree of interest from hmrc:whistle:
 
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so this is the new plastic one

polymer-20-specimen-front-(1).jpg



Must be why my local cash machines have only been issuing tenners recently

I think my vault of krugies is still OK.
 
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IIRC, you can exchange cash at the bank.
Although someone walking in with their pantaloons held up with braces, pushing a wheelbarrow - full of purplebacks, might arouse a degree of interest from hmrc:whistle:

So long as it is no more than £10 k The Bank will not inform HMRC
 
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All you builders and plumbers had better make a start on spending those old paper ones you have stashed around the house.

The days of walking around with pockets full of £50 notes are long gone, it's all BAX now.
 
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If you're from up North (i.e. the far north of England) you'll be familiar with Scottish notes, which are accepted everywhere in northern parts of Cumbria and Northumberland. Unlike us English who just have one note for each denomination, Scotland has notes in circulation from different banks for each denomination. You see the occasional Ulster Bank note too. Add this to English money, and you can have several different tenners in your wallet. I was in Carlisle recently and was given in my change a Scottish tenner of the new material, so yet another one to add to the mix. The further south you go from here, the less likely they are to take Scottish notes, with big signs in pubs and shops proclaiming "Scottish notes not accepted!". This might sound unfriendly, but it's for the quite good reason that shopkeepers do not recognise the notes.
 
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EddieM

If you're from up North (i.e. the far north of England) you'll be familiar with Scottish notes, which are accepted everywhere in northern parts of Cumbria and Northumberland. Unlike us English who just have one note for each denomination, Scotland has notes in circulation from different banks for each denomination. You see the occasional Ulster Bank note too. Add this to English money, and you can have several different tenners in your wallet. I was in Carlisle recently and was given in my change a Scottish tenner of the new material, so yet another one to add to the mix. The further south you go from here, the less likely they are to take Scottish notes, with big signs in pubs and shops proclaiming "Scottish notes not accepted!". This might sound unfriendly, but it's for the quite good reason that shopkeepers do not recognise the notes.

They don't have to, nor do you have to accept them as they aren't legal tender in England.
 
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