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New build dormer

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by tazuk123, 17 Aug 2021.

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  1. tazuk123

    tazuk123

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    DF457783-6172-457B-B16B-390909266816.jpeg DF457783-6172-457B-B16B-390909266816.jpeg A315A21A-D849-4B26-B7B1-6E90BF912AF1.jpeg 3158C024-8B41-4C99-9E50-5A69E9252ACF.jpeg CB4D0FE6-F047-4F46-95D9-566D9BDE12BC.jpeg E80D896A-A4DE-4F2D-9AC1-8BC7B03F7C16.jpeg Hi All,

    I was wondering if you think I could fit a dormer in my property. Just for a bed / table and storage for my teenage daughter. We can’t afford to move out so hoping we could go up. Nobody else in the area has one, it was built in 2010. Before I start getting quotes etc I was just thinking by looking at the pics if you think it’s possible. We had a neighbour say no because we have steel trusts.
     
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  3. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    How high is it from floor to roof?
    Do you have room for the extra staircase from the 1st floor allowing 2m clearance?
    Do you have any covenants on your deeds restricting this?

    It looks like a prefab roof system. These are typically stronger than on-site built, but use less wood, more frequently spaced. Depending on where you live, its probably 30-45k
     
  4. tony1851

    tony1851

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    Technically it's perfectly feasible to build a dormer with a truss roof, other things being equal.

    But before you go any further, you need to check with the council if your permitted development rights have been withdrawn.

    Manchester Corporation have usually done that with modern high-density developments, which means that while a flat roof dormer would normally be permitted development, you would need planning permission, which you would not get because planning departments don't like dormers.
     
  5. tazuk123

    tazuk123

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    Thanks for the replies. I have gone ahead and emailed planning at Manchester City council. We purchased the property in 2010 and as it was a new build it has a lease for 999 years and the land owners are Manchester City Council. I have a funny feeling they will say no under permitted development then ask us to go down the planning permission route and then ask for a lot of money if we want a dormer.
     
  6. tony1851

    tony1851

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    If they tell you that there is an Article 4 declaration on the estate (withdrawing your permitted development rights), they will invite you to submit a planning application. Don't be fooled because they will refuse it, but take your £206 application fee for the pleasure.
     
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  8. tazuk123

    tazuk123

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    Good news

    Your estate has permitted development rights for dormers and roof works, therefore, so long as you build in accordance with the attached regs, it would not require planning permission. Once you have more details (technical/architectural drawings) you can email them to me and I will check they accord for you before you start works.


    What I really want to push for is to use the maximum amount of space and go for a full width dormer, which will obviously have to go to planning. Would that be a waste of money I’m guessing they would more than likely reject that.
     

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  9. tony1851

    tony1851

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    A full-width dormer would not require planning permission.

    The only criteria you need to meet are in that document (Part B - 'Roof Enlargements') which gives the few, easy conditions you need to meet.
     
  10. tazuk123

    tazuk123

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    Hi,

    I have had plans back from our architect and before we commit to anything I just wanted to double check if anybody could see a way of us getting more bedroom space from what’s available. We were thinking that we could move the en-suite in the angled part of the loft so we could have a bigger bedroom but before we go back to him any other ideas would be great. Thank you.
     

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  11. tony1851

    tony1851

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    You mention an ensuite but what you have is a separate bathroom.

    If you had a true ensuite in the main bedroom, you could get a better-shaped main room, and also give some extra space to the front bedroom (which will be small to begin with by being wholly under the front slope).

    Some of the additional space is obtained by reducing the doors off the landing from 3 to 2. The downside is that you'd need a S&VP at the back, though the ensuite would have it's own window.
     

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  12. Leeb#122

    Leeb#122

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    Hi
    I am currently converting my loft into a extra bedroom.

    What is your ceiling height on your first floor and thickness specification of the ceiling timber as you might have to install extra support for the loft conversion floor. Supporting walls on the first floor might not meet the requirements for a dormer.

    If so and height of your ceiling is above 2.4 metres, (I'm not sure about the exact height) then you could consider lowering the first floor ceiling to create more loft space.
     
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