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New uPVC Underground Drain Fittings Seeping

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Tozzy, 21 Jun 2017.

  1. Ian H

    Ian H

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    No thanks, I'd take an Osma 4D900 any day. The fact that it has a permanent access for jetting/cctv makes it a winner for me, it's easy to raise up with 6" plastic if you need to, the outlet comes off at a sensible angle, the grate is twice the size and they cost less than £20.

    The shoe was too high, water would have splashed onto the tarmac. I prefer to cut the grate and run the rain water pipe directly into the gully:

    IMG_1222.JPG

    I'm not a plumber, I'm a drainage engineer. What's a grubber?
     
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  3. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    It's a Yard Gully Ian.
    Drainage Engineer.......I'll do the jokes!!! You're a common Labourer FFS!!
     
  4. Ian H

    Ian H

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    Job title says Drainage Engineer but I'd happily take Common Labourer, makes no difference (y)
     
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  5. Reminds me of when my father was selling life insurance, and asked the husband what his job was. When he said he was a waste processing engineer, his wife shouted out from the kitchen, and said " don't be ridiculous, you're a bloody dustman".

    A jobs a job, whatever the description.
     
  6. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Nice job Ian. I've always used bottle gullies for whatever, BCO specifies 'a trapped gulley', and he's never complained.

    Technically if connecting to storm drain and so no trap is required, you could used a rainwater or debris gulley, to catch any detritus washed off the roof, but I don't think I've ever known one be specified. Usually either direct connection to the drain or a standard gulley.
     
  7. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Nice job my arze, he's not even sealed the Black Stuff patch!! C'mon!!

    Most RW goes straight into the system without traps here in Jockoland Hugh on new builds. On old combined systems it's Rainwater Traps & Heart Heads(a square for the downpipe & the full plastic grate).
    But you chancers down south are as rough as feck!!
     
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  9. Ian H

    Ian H

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    I seal the edges, with edge sealer.

    IMG_1215.JPG
     
  10. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    It does down here, on new builds with a separate system for rainwater. Trapped gullies are only required if connecting to a combined system. I suppose you have to get it right up there, the weather does nothing but pizz it down from what I've heard.

    Down here, the standard of drainage now on most new builds is bloody awful, 'Groundworkers' seem to be a jack of all trades and masters of none. Their Victorian Ancestors would be spinning in there graves if they saw the 'work' some pass off today.
     
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  11. Tozzy

    Tozzy

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    Ok guys I have some updates, but before I continue:

    So now I realise now what was initially missing from my installation!
    I'll give you all a hint:

    Led Zeppelin, The rolling stones, Queen and of course, The Beatles.
    Still clueless??

    Ok, this picture may help:

    DSC_2103.JPG

    Answer: Rockers (formally known as rocker pipes) :)

    So what I decided to do was use a double socket fixed 45* from soil pipe into a rocker pipe which from there enters the IC inlet. Now, exiting the outlet, I've added a rocker there, then a single socket 20* which goes straight into a slip coupling (to allow for any movement/ settlement) and then a short offcut which goes into a single socket 10* which goes straight into the ac4000 adaptor. All good up to now? I think it's a huge improvement; it feels more secure and robust and it simply just looks more professional. So again, from the main inlet we see the rocker pipe which enters the branch, so do I just bridge from there straight to that multiflex bend which connects directly to tick gully? I have absolutely no problem using the multiflex here where the gully is concerned and I feel that this is their only place in the installation.
    So again, many thanks to Hugh for his great advice and to be honest, it was so much easier doing this having seen Ian's work; just observing the way he'd placed his fittings. The only thing that I haven't done (unless there is anything else?) is laid the IC on a bed of concrete which I am aware of, however, I only realised this when I returned home with the fittings and didn't have cement so what I've done is laid it on a level slab to give the IC support and the IC is perfectly level. If it's going to be a massive problem, I'll relay the IC when I commence work at the front of house later on in the year, but I personally don't see why a slab wouldn't suffice? Every video/ picture I've ever seen, I've only ever seen the IC (whether shallow or deep) laid on 100mm pea shingle and simply backfilled.

    I'll just need a bit of advice for the next phase and then I should be ok, but what I propose to do now is extend the branch with 600mm pipe, then attach slip coupling, extend another 600mm with pipe, slip coupling again and then another 1800mm pipe makes a 3m run and attach branch to spur off to gully.

    After that, extend the run again this time 2m (allowing spaces for slip couplings as before) and install another tick gully, use a raising piece with rainwater adaptor for 68mm down-pipe straight into top of raising piece. If I'm not on the right track, let me know please! I'll post up some new pictures soon anyway.
    Thanks guys!

    A top down view if it helps:

    DSC_2104.JPG
     
    Last edited: 25 Jun 2017
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  12. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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  13. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Looks a lot better, only thing I would have done differently is put the bends immediately outside the chamber, and then run from there directly to the clayware. It will be fine as it is though, rods should still pass through that section if required.

    I would put a bit of concrete round the base of the chamber though to hold it in place, given its shallow depth. I am assuming only pedestrian traffic will be passing over this area?

    Rockers aren't really needed with plastic pipes to be honest, you should push the pipe/spigot into the socket then withdraw it slightly to give a little room for expansion. Rockers are used with clay and concrete pipes, where you are entering/leaving a manhole/headwall/well or any other type of concrete/masonry structure, to allow movement. Otherwise you have a pipe run joining a large lump of masonry, and any slight movement could/would crack the pipework adjacent to the manhole. I have been on jobs where we were laying larger diameter concrete pipes and the Clerk of Works has, on occasions, insisted on 2 rockers being used.
     
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  14. DIYnot Local

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