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Nissan X-trail old style over newer

Discussion in 'General Cars' started by Danoil, 20 Jan 2013.

  1. Danoil

    Danoil

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    Hi, after having our 52 plate Freelander written off this week we have been looking for a new 4x4 to replace it with and have been looking at the X-trail. The sticking point for us is the older (pre 2004) DI diesel model compared to spending a little bit more and getting the post 2004 DCI engined newer version. As far as I can see, the fuel economy is the same it's only the performance that is different. If anyone knows about these could give any info/ pointers it would be much appreciated.
    Thanks, Dan
     
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  3. Peter.N.

    Peter.N.

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    An IDI engine is less likely to go wrong and likely cheaper to repair than a common rail. the modern engine should give better fuel consumption unless of course you use all that extra power.

    I am not familier with you car but speaking generally the old IDI engines are more durable. I have only changed to Common rail for the improved economy, the Peugeot/Citroen Hdi 8 valve engines I am using have so far proved very reliable but many other makes are and types are not.

    Hopefully someone who has the car you are considering will be along soon.

    Peter
     
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  4. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    The diesel X Trail hasn't really been the pillar of reliability that Nissan wanted - the early one is bugged by timing chain and injector issues (the latter which have been known to goose the turbo too)....its had numerous software recalls but Nissan do know all about it.
    Since using Renault diesels things have been a bit better (only quoting the 1.5 dci here - the bigger one is a stranger to me) and the only real issue have been again injector problems (back to Nissan for that one) and the particulate filter in the exhaust. This tends to fail due to short runs and Nissan say give it a good run to regenerate. Does it hell. If the pollution lamp is lit on the dashboard, it needs a new DPF as they call it.
    Can't say any more, sorry.....it is recommended that all 4 tyres are replaced at the same time to prevent differential issues but I've no knowledge of that.
    John :)
     
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  5. Peter.N.

    Peter.N.

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    you will do John :D

    Peter
     
  6. Danoil

    Danoil

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    Thank you both for your help, I have noticed on all the DCI engined ones I have seen (including father in laws and our neighbours) the oil coolers have been leaking from the front corner which then covers everything in oil. Plus they all sound rough as hell from start up, is this anything to be concerned about or just par for the course with these?
     
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  8. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Is this the oil cooler under the oil filter at the front of the engine (1.5) Dan?
    I've never seen a split one, but its impossible to change the filter without getting an armful of lube, which obligingly trickles to the bottom of the motor, drenching the A/C compressor in the process.
    I don't find these engines overly noisy on start up - just the usual diesel clatter.
    John :)
     
  9. Danoil

    Danoil

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    No they are sat on top of the engine (2.2l). I have a New Peugeot Bipper 1.4tdi for work which does clatter a bit from cold I have noticed so maybe I am fussing over nothing in this respect but thought I would ask as I would sooner have as much info as poss from people in the know before i part with my hard earned!
     
  10. Avocet

    Avocet

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    There's a very good X-Trail forum where you could get lots of good advice:

    http://www.x-trail-uk.co.uk/

    For what it's worth, we have a '56 plate 2.2 DCI. Last of the "old tech" mechanical diesels. Yes, on a cold startup they have been described as sounding like "someone kicking a canvas bag of spanners down a fire escape"! This is much improved by using a good quality fully synthetic 5W40 oil instead of the recommended 5W30.

    I think the "oil cooler" referred to - on top of the engine, is actually the intercooler. They do seem to give trouble and it has been suggested that if ignored, can also knacker the turbo. Early cars (2003-4) were famous for turbo failures, but most should have had theirs replaced under warranty by now.

    Up to early 2006, they were slightly more economical. Late 2006 saw the transition to "Euro 4" emissions levels and they got a bit thirstier. From 2007 onwards, they were face-lifted (referred to as the "T31" model rather than the "T30") and they were Renault-powered. More power, more refinement, more economy, but more complexity too.

    On the whole, I have been a bit disappointed with ours. It has never "broken down" but in just under 70,000 miles it has needed a damper, 4 reconditioned brake calipers (for which they're famous!), an anti roll bar droplink, rear anti roll bar bushes, front lower arms...

    On the plus side, the wife absolutely loves it (They are quite a nice drive in a lazy, torquey sort of way) and it's utterly brilliant in snow. Worth going for the Aventura spec with heated leather seats, Sat-nav, and Traction Control. The latter is important because it's not a "proper" 4x4 in that it doesn't have a set of low ratio gears or any diff locks, so the traction control uses the ABS pump to apply the brake to the spinning wheel(s).
     
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  11. Danoil

    Danoil

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    Thank you very much for all the info, very helpful!
     
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