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(novice alert) Fluorescent bathroom light dim

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Madthinker, 8 May 2020.

  1. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    [QUOTE="Madthinker, post: 4630902, member: 273030"]

    View attachment 192361 [/QUOTE]

    I refer to Picture 1 in Post #11

    It appears that the four Red/Brown insulated conductors are connected via a Twin "Set_Screw" connector, similar to that used in Australia for the required "Protective Earth" connections. (To be sure, to be sure.)
    (See https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Australian_Set_Screw_Connectors.jpg)

    This is the first time that I have seen such a connector pictured on this UK site and I wonder what is it that these connectors are called in the UK?

    I note that, unlike the Australian dual/twin screw connectors, which are required only for Protective Earth connection, the connector shown is "blind", in that no conductor may protrude from it.

    I also note that the way in which this connector has been installed would not be approved in Australia, since none of the conductors are visible beyond the ferrule concerned, indicating that the (last) set-screw may not have connected with the conductors.

    A "normal" (Single-Screw) Australian connector may be viewed at https://www.sparkydirect.com.au/p/30007/nls-single-screw-insulated-electrical-connector-2.html
    The "Dual Screw" connector may be viewed at https://www.sparkydirect.com.au/p/888595/nls---two-screw-insulated-connector---50-per-jar.html
     
    Last edited: 18 May 2020
  2. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Connectors/ chocolate block connectors/ terminals. They are a common type in the UK, coming in 2amp, 5amp, 10amp and larger sizes. The current refers not to the actual rating, rather than to the sizes of cables which will fit in them. Prior to these there were porcelain insulated versions, which are useful for higher temperatures.

    Even older, there were porcelain 'screwits' like a porcelain socket, with a course thread moulded into the porcelain. You just stripped the wire, twisted them together, then screwed on the 'screwit' to tighten the joint. These and a plastic version were banned long ago for UK use, but they don't work very well with unstranded cable anyway.
     
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  4. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Just looks like a single part of a connector block to me.
     
  5. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    Thank you.

    I now see that it is just a single "Pair" cut off from a "connector block" and is open at both ends (NOT "blind" as I first thought.)
     
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