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Oak door casing attaching door stops?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by RickyLee53, 27 Mar 2013.

  1. RickyLee53

    RickyLee53

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    Hello,

    I purchased an oak door casing with loose stops, whats the best way to attach them?

    I'm assuming wood glue and wedge inplace, but wondered if I was missing something.
     
  2. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    Fix the stops after the door is hung,I use an air nailer to fix stops but hand nailing is fine pre drilling would help,unless the stop's are thicker than 3/4" then screw and plug.
     
  3. RickyLee53

    RickyLee53

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    Sorry,

    I missed the important bit. I don't want any visual fixes. I suppose small nails from the nail gun are "ok" but would rather glue if possible.
     
  4. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    If you do a good job of filling the holes they won't show
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    If you think about it - it is all but impossible to clamp them whilst the glue goes off which is why no trade joiner/carpenter would do it that way. For clear finish work I use an 18 gauge nailer, punch the heads under then fill with matching coloured wax sold for the purpose. You can mix several colours together to get an exact match. Wax has been used fior just this purpose for more than 100 years (at least I can find references to it going that far back)
     
  6. gritmonkey

    gritmonkey

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    If you're insistent on gluing them, and you don't need to use the door at least until the glue has set then you can cut some strips of 1/2 ply, say 2" wide and 1-2" longer than the width of the opening. Glue the stop lats and hold them in place with the strips of ply, with them being cut longer then they will try spring out holding the stop lats in place. If you do use this method then cut some pieces of card (a cereal box is ideal) and put them between the stop lat and the closed door(double the thickness of the cardboard for the hinge side to prevent any binding).

    HTH.
     
  7. RickyLee53

    RickyLee53

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    That was pretty much the method I was thinking. :)
     
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  9. foxhole

    foxhole

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    You could use a couple of quick clamps to hold in place.
     
  10. Dave54

    Dave54

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    You can clamp most things as suggested here, but whether it's worth it or not is another matter. If it's pinned, it won't move. If it moved somehow while the glue was setting, unlikely though that is unless it gets physically knocked, then you'd have a bigger problem than a few tiny holes. Particularly with an open grained timber like oak, as long as you use a small nail punch carefully, and fill the hole with the right coloured wax, you really won't see it. Honestly I've filled small holes in oak in the past, and not been able to find them easily myself after. It's all a matter of what level of detail is seen. When you're doing things you can drive yourself mad with detail which no-one else would see.
     
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  11. RickyLee53

    RickyLee53

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    Tell me about it, we are doing every aspect of the house. I reckon its taking me twice as long with the details but hopefully it'll be worth it in the end. My Mrs just shakes her head and says you won't notice anyway. :LOL:
     
  12. Dave54

    Dave54

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    The details are what takes the time. I used to make (although I say it myself) very good quality, mostly "one off" pieces of wooden furniture. They all involved a lot of hand work. Furniture, especially things like drawers which can be taken out and examined get looked at fairly closely by the client, and any glaring faults would quickly be seen. Furniture making is a fairly nit picking, and an almost claustrophobic thing to do, and it's easy to let yourself get dragged into seeing every "fault" which no client would see, and which really doesn't matter. The trick, with any job or trade is knowing what matters and what doesn't. What will actually be seen, and what will never be noticed. I'm not talking about bodging things up incidentally, just placing a sensible and achievable limit on quality.
     
  13. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    Well said Dave I'm sure a lot of us have been there but without a bit of obsession you would never get there,there the bit's that you never priced for,that the client get's for free.
     
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  14. RickyLee53

    RickyLee53

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    Thats actually very true.

    I am by nature a little of a perfectionist, and my eye is always drawn to the bits I'm not happy with. When most others wouldn't even notice it.

    I'm a keen believer in doing things right from the start, and not been afraid to ask for advice.
     
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