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Outbuilding 2.8m tall near boundary

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by jarmstrong, 31 May 2021.

  1. jarmstrong

    jarmstrong

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    Hi, I am in Essex and I would like to build an outbuilding 4.9m x 2.7 meters (approx 13sqm) and 2.8m tall near the neighbour boundary. I would need planning permission because it is above the 2.5m tall permitted development limit.

    Would I need building regulations approval as well? According to planning portal, an outbuilding less than 15sqm would not need building regs approval.

    Have I understood the rules correctly that I can apply for planning permission, but need not get building regulations approval for this outbuilding?



    Thank you for any advice or guidance.
     
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  3. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Below 15 square metres you only need to comply with electrics for building regs.

    If over 2.5m and within 2 metres of boundary you need planning permission.

    That is taken from the highest point of the adjacent ground - so on a sloping site you might get away with it.
     
  4. Nakajo

    Nakajo

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    If you had somewhere else to stick the earth, could get a mini digger on site, and could provide decent drainage all round, it might be an idea to excavate a foot or so of soil.
     
  5. jarmstrong

    jarmstrong

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    Thank you.

    Does anyone know of any objections the council could have for the 2.8m height on this one?

    The neighbour said it would be no problem for them. There are no drains in the proposed area but there are tall conifers 5-6 metres away. Is there any reason the council could refuse permission for 2.8m height?
     
  6. Ask them.
     
  7. Is it just that youd rather not pay the fees, or is there going to be something flaky about the building? :sneaky::D

    Dont forget that the electrics may well need building control involvement anyway if you dont use a registered electrician.
     
  8. jarmstrong

    jarmstrong

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    I did, they said they would not comment until I put in a specific application. Just want to gain some prior understanding and be sure I have all things considered when I put in the application. There is also some time saving to getting it right on first go.
     
  9. OK. Most Some councils do have an informal planning advice system. Yours might have done.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 1 Jun 2021
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  11. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    Do you live in in 1993?
     
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The main factor is how over bearing it is to the neighbours garden or outlook. The same thing may be acceptable in one part of the garden but not another due to several factors. Read your councils planning policies and any supplementary guidance

    If you submit an application, if the planners don't like it you are given an opportunity to change it or withdraw it.
     
  13. Nope.
     
  14. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Appears @Captain Nemesis was referring to Pre-application advice, which is informal.
     
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  15. I was, and I thought Id said that.

    Was freddymercurys reply based on pedantic nitpicking rather than such informal advice systems now being rare?
     
  16. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    No not pedantic, based on the real world, if you want to pay for pre-planning advice and wait 6 weeks for a potentially meaningless or damning response (which no one in their right mind would do so for an domestic outbuilding) then that's one thing.

    Or perhaps you are referring to ringing up the planning department and perhaps getting through to the duty planner who's pulled the short straw that day and asking for their opinion, which will be worth less than the value of a chocolate teacup?
     
  17. Pre-application advice



    Planning permission

    It is often a good idea to meet a planning officer for an informal discussion before you submit an application. Some local planning authorities charge for this service so it’s a good idea to check first. It is also a question you have to answer in the application form and can assist the local authority in dealing with your application.


    Pre-application advice is encouraged as it can:



    If you are meeting a planning officer you should be fully prepared to describe your proposals and show plans. You can:



    The level of preparation required depends on what you propose to do. In simple cases it should be sufficient to look at the main issues governing the grant of permission and decide which of these are relevant to your application.


    It is important that you say why you think your proposed development should be allowed to go ahead. Please bear in mind that planning applications will normally be decided in accordance with the development plan, therefore you will need to justify any proposals which would constitute an exception to the plan.


    So, picking out the opening paragraph:

    1)It is

    often

    a

    good

    idea


    to meet a planning officer for an informal discussion before you submit an application.


    2) Some local planning authorities charge for this service so it’s a good idea to check first.

    3) It is also a question you have to answer in the application form and can assist the local authority in dealing with your application.


    And dont forget that the implication of #2 is that some dont.
     
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