parquet floor restoration

M

mkultr4

Hi

I have bought a 1930's semi which i am renovating before moving in

we have discovered a herringbone parquet floor in front and back lounge and hall - its currently hidden under laminate flooring

we are assuming that this will need restoration.
the question is, should we do the restoration before all internal painting takes place or wait until the decorating has finished?

it has been suggested to do the floor 1st as the dust created will make a mess of the painting (dust gets ingranied in walls surface - is this true?

also any rough estimates of how much this would cost if we get a company in v how much to do ourselves? - there is also a blank area where concrete hearth was - this will need to be chsiled out and parquet installed

thanks
 
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Hi

I would sand it before decorating as it is a very dusty job.

See your local hire shop for a floor sander and make sure your get the correct grade grit because you don't want to end up sanding down to the tongues and grooves of the floor,which ive seen happen before.

Reclamation yard for your repairs or you can use a solid hardwood flooring that you might have to rip down to your desired width.

Easy diy to sand but repairs may be challenging ?
 
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No, first decorating, then trying to hire a proper belt sander.

The normal hire centres will only have drum sanders available, which can ruin your floor when the iron bar pressing down the sanding sheet to the drum hits the floor with every turn = shatter marks.

Proper belt sanders come with better dust extraction too, they will produce some dust but not as much as a drum sander.
Besides, it is dry dust, so easily brushed of wall.

More info on this, the 7 easy step guide
 
M

mkultr4

No, first decorating, then trying to hire a proper belt sander.

The normal hire centres will only have drum sanders available, which can ruin your floor when the iron bar pressing down the sanding sheet to the drum hits the floor with every turn = shatter marks.

Proper belt sanders come with better dust extraction too, they will produce some dust but not as much as a drum sander.
Besides, it is dry dust, so easily brushed of wall.

More info on this, the 7 easy step guide

Hi and thanks

Why would you says its best to get the decorating done 1st?

i would prefer it this way round but the guy im working with swears floor should be done before painting.

Thanks
 
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What about paint spillages? Tools and ladders being dragged about on your newly sanded and finished floor?
 
M

mkultr4

do you have any make/models of these belt sanders?
All the plant hire centres local to me seem to have drum sanders only.

Thanks
 
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Try here: http://thewoodflooringcompany.com/ although near Manchester I know they work in a large area. Not sure if they hire out, but do know they have the right equipment for the job in hand and it might be worth asking for a proper quote
 
M

mkultr4

Thanks - have asked for a quote.

Any idea how long this would take a diyer? Its in 2 rooms of about 16m2 each plus a narrow hallway.

also, is it the bona sander thats the best for this job?

Thanks
 
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That can only be answered properly when the existing finish and possible damage is assessed, and that is hard to tell from this distance ;)
 
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I don't often say this, but on this I agree with woodyoulike.

A good quality continuous belt sander like a Bona or Lagler with a good quality dust bag or separate dust collection unit will leave very little dust. Gravity sucks towards the floor so that's where all the paint and other decorating debris ends up. Also most finishes that you put on a floor need a good few days to cure and should not be covered during the first week.

You could meet half way and sand and seal the floor with a single coat of whatever. Then decorate, then key back the floor surface and apply the final coats. It will sort the paint roller spray but not dents that ladders etc will leave.

TT
 
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you've got experiences with this company Tall-Tone? If so, I will recommend them to others when they ask for belt sanders for hire in that area.
 
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They are fine but it means a drive to Warwick.
I know they run these machines around the Midlands etc, but how much that costs I am not sure.
They also have a Trio which is very useful.

TT
 
M

mkultr4

These are the guys I use for occasional sander hire, not sure how far up they go. They hire quality continuous belt sanders that won't leave the house covered in dust.
http://www.hirecentres.com/category/floor-sanding-equipment-hire.html

TT

Thanks, i will look into the areas they cover.

If anybody knows of an outfit that has the same equipment based near merseyside, it would be appreciated.

Incidentaly, i got a quote from 1 company for sanding and finish only - they came back with £25 per metre - which i thought was a bit steep.

Cheers
 

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