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Planing

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by SaladFingers, 10 Nov 2012.

  1. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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  3. ladylola

    ladylola

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    To be honest even if I use a power plane I will still finish it off by hand and sometimes it's less of a faff to do it by hand rather than messing around with a transformer and leads. I tend to prefer my jack plane but as I don't always have it with me I'm still ok with a smoothing plane. I've seen people use a block plane and make a good job too, it's all about what you feel comfortable with I think.
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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  5. SaladFingers

    SaladFingers

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    Hey, I'm not stupid. I fitted the door and frame myself and am more than competent with tools. Used my circular saw loads and I observe safety with that over anything else.
     
  6. SaladFingers

    SaladFingers

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  7. gregers

    gregers

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    i do the same as jobandknock,on my bosch blue ;) i use the adjustable guide which covers the blade if i only want to plane down a small width.

    but i see what you mean.
     
  8. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    Perhaps there should be some how to safely vids on the site???
     
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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  11. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    I think your missing the point here ,lets put ego's to one side and work on the basis of what can happen will happen, thats the way it goes!!!!
     
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  12. SaladFingers

    SaladFingers

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    Well let's not get carried away now. It has nothing to do with egos. It's more egotistical to say 'should we give advice to someone who wants to do it himself'.
     
  13. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Sorry, but are you saying that those of us in the position to give advice, freely, are all driven by ego? I think that HWW was acting out of genuine concern for the safety of people reading this thread. Power tools are all potentially dangerous. Tradespeople generally know, sometimes from painful personal experience, or the experiences of colleagues, where a lot of the pitfalls are. Many DIYers do not. Surely it cannot be in anyone's interest to withhold the "gotchas" when discussing such issues?

    BTW can we get back on topic, now? :D
     
  14. SaladFingers

    SaladFingers

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    No need to be sorry. And no I'm not saying that. I did not bring 'ego' into it, someone else did.

    I do appreciate advice, but I certainly hope you'd not question wheather I think those who can give advice are driven by ego, yet let someone else try and assume I am.
     
  15. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    To get back OT, then. A joiner would traditionally have used a jack plane (#5 or #5-1/2 - 5-1/2 are wider, but not needed in many instances) to do this task. Smoothing planes (~3, #4 and #4-1/2) are probably a bit short for the task whilst a fore plane (#6) or a jointer (#7) would be too long. The problem these days is that most of what masquerade as planes are pretty bloody awful! Cheap makes like Groz, Anant or Kunz are plain inadequate out of the box with warped soles, poor quality blades and shoddy adjusters. No-name DIY store "specials" are even worse! No wonder that many DIYers bever learn to plane properly. The difficulty is that to turn one of these ugly ducklings into something more swan like it takes a bit of education and experience. If you want to buy a jack plane straight out of the box which works perfectly, straight away you can only really go for 3 makes: Clifton, Veritas or Lie-Nielsen. As you can see they aren't cheap. What were once "quality" makes like Stanley and Record are now very much degraded and IMHO not worth considering these days, although Stanley is at least still made in the UK (Record now manufacture in the far East and the quality is poo!)..... Sort of Catch 22, really. About the only "quality" jack plane I know of on the market is probably the Qiangsheng #5, at £100. I say "probably" because I've never seen one, but I did take a punt on two smaller planes from the same maker and they are very good - not quite in the top table league, but nonetheless streets ahead of the stuff at £70 and below. Just be prepared to sharpen and hone the blade if you get it.

    My problem with doing it that way is this - with a circular saw, two cramps and a batten I can shorten a door very quickly and accurately (you need to either scribe the timber with a knife where the blade exits or clamp on a sacrificial block to stop any spelching). I will use a block plane to clean-up at the end if needs be, but that's it. With a hand plane it takes longer, certainly in inexperienced hands, especially if it's a poorly set-up plane. It will be awkward and frustrating to do the job and having to plane in from both sides will create further problems of having to work against the grain, etc. Makes using a power planer seem a lot simpler
     
  16. Harbourwoodwork

    Harbourwoodwork

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    I haven't heard anyone say spelch for donkeys,a great old word that is totally descriptive and onomatopoeic in "T"bargin ,I wonder what the root's are.maybe Norse
     
  17. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    :LOL: I use other old words, too, like "turnscrew".....
     
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