Planning permission (underground)?

T

toasty

Thanks for all who've responded.

Good point about a sump, I'd not considered that.

It really is looking likely that I'll be doing this. Gonna speak to a few friends on the weekend, if they are up for it, and the budget of about 2grand is reasonable then I may well do it. It's going to make a right mess of the garden though :LOL:
 
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and here's one I prepared earlier:

ROC_Post.gif
 
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toasty, if you think that you're going to build a concrete bunker for £2000.00 then you're way off the mark.
at 3mx3mx2.4m, you will need to remove a minimum of 40 cubic metres of soil.
the logistic cost alone of digging and shifting this mutch soil will cost a minimum of £1000.00.
the concrete and steel costs will easily cost £1800.00.
unless somebody in the trade owes you a favour, then forget it.

p.s. make sure you have plenty of top coverage over the bunker roof.
if you don't, due to the lack of drainage, as result of concrete's impervious nature, you will end up with a bog when it rains.
 
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noseall said:
toasty, if you think that you're going to build a concrete bunker for £2000.00 then you're way off the mark.
at 3mx3mx2.4m, you will need to remove a minimum of 40 cubic metres of soil.
the logistic cost alone of digging and shifting this mutch soil will cost a minimum of £1000.00.
the concrete and steel costs will easily cost £1800.00.
unless somebody in the trade owes you a favour, then forget it..

You'll probably easily add another grand to the job meeting building regulations by the time you condider ventilation, fire safety, electrics, energy efficiency (assuming you'll want to heat it) etc.

noseall said:
p.s. make sure you have plenty of top coverage over the bunker roof. if you don't, due to the lack of drainage, as result of concrete's impervious nature, you will end up with a bog when it rains.

Your lawn will also die in the summer! I speak from experience here - in my last house I had a concrete cover for a septic tank about 1' under the lawn. Every summer I had a big rectangle of dead brown grass in the middle of the lawn..... :cry:
 
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This a epic in the making ,it could put "does rising damp exsist" in the shallows :LOL:
 
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all i'm saying to toasty is tread carefully.
relatively speaking a ground floor job is easiest, and the least expensive.
a first floor job, more expensive.
a loft conversion, more expensive still.
the same applies going down. its just so daunting to think that you need to remove so mutch material before the job can begin.
i think a word with some swimming pool engineers may come in handy.
 
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Noseall,
I agree with what you are saying 100%.I just feel that if toasty is genuine he has not really thought through what I see as a interesting project for a back garden.

If toasty does give it a go I am sure he will have many questions as the project progresses
.Like I said"epic" :LOL:


P.S I think the hatch cause a few problems ;)
 
T

toasty

Chaps,

Thanks really for all who have offered their opinions.

2 or 3 grand doesn't really make much difference to be honest, it's all just a bit of fun, and as I say the option of more sheds or garages is not really an option, so it's down or nothing.

heatingwise, I would say, none, would just be storing stuff down there, can't imagine I'd want to heat the place.

Also, from what I've read, as long as it's 10 or so foot from the house, I don't need to worry too much about the official route, I just claim - as in fairness it is, that it is a fallout/nuclear shelter.

Spoke to a mate tonight, luckily I do have friends in the trade, he reckons the soil can be taken away for a much smaller sum than I thought and he says that I'd be better off getting the bulk of the walls built in blocks rather than try pouring in gallons and tonnes of concrete.

From the chat I had tonight, he reckons 2 grand isn't too far off the mark, and from my perspective if it comes in less than five I'm happy too.

Watch this space, I'm gonna have me a bunker PDS!! ;)

-Dan
 
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toasty said:
from my perspective if it comes in less than five grand I'm happy too.

Steady on, that's the best part of a week's wages!
 
T

toasty

JohnD, I've just been googling,

Small detached buildings such as garages, sheds & greenhouses with no sleeping accommodation that do not exceed 30m2 internal floor area and are built of substantially non-combustible materials if within 1m of a boundary. Timber sheds with less than 15m2 floor area can be built within 1m of a boundary and still be exempt. Nuclear fallout shelters are also exempt if less than 30m2 floor area and any excavations are far enough away from other buildings so as not to affect their foundations.

So I don't need to tell anyone about my project then? If I wanted I could start tomorrow. :D
 
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That's the one I was thinking of. Couldn't find it again when I looked earlier. Didn't remenber 30m2 though, seems a bit small.

edited
for anyone who cares, I found the Building Regulations definition for shelters at last. I knew I'd seen it somewhere.

"CLASS VI
Small detached buildings
1. A detached single storey building, having a floor area which does not exceed 30m2, which contains no sleeping accommodation and is a building—

(a)no point of which is less than one metre from the boundary of its curtilage; or .
(b)which is constructed substantially of non-combustible material. .
2. A detached building designed and intended to shelter people from the effects of nuclear, chemical or conventional weapons, and not used for any other purpose, if—

(a)its floor area does not exceed 30m2; and .
(b)the excavation for the building is no closer to any exposed part of another building or structure than a distance equal to the depth of the excavation plus one metre. .
3. A detached building, having a floor area which does not exceed 15m2, which contains no sleeping accommodation. "

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2000/2531/schedule/2/made
 
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Block walls wouldnt be my first choice of wall material. You risk the whole thing colapsing. Course depends on thickness of walls, cover slab size etc etc etc etc..
 
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all the best shelters are made of RC so the sides don't come in when the ground ripples with the shock wave.
 

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