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Powering up underfloor electric heating (1100w) using 3 pin socket plug

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Samsg30, 8 Mar 2018.

  1. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    Hi,

    I am planning to put underfloor electric heating in Kitchen (8m2 - 1120watt) which seems fairly straight forward with my current DIY skills.

    Just need to confirm if I can run the power to electric heating (using thermostat) via 3 pin plug in one of the available socket in the kitchen without breaking regulation?
    Whole house power circuit is fronted by RCD in the consumer unit and I read in the instructions that thermostat should have double pole switch in front.
    So rather than messing around with a complete new wiring from consumer unit or running internal wiring spur from power socket and putting double pole swich, easiest option I can find is to run a simple 2.5mm cable up using 3 pin socket (with 13A fuse) to the thermostat and leave the power switch on all the time.

    Of course that cable will be visible which I can easily run it through behind the plaster board as well

    Do you see any problem with regulations / risks etc for this?

    It's wooden flooring in kitchen and there may be accidental spill of water ... just wondering do I need additional RCD in front? Guess not .. as the whole circuit has RCD in consumer unit.
     
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  3. big-all

    big-all

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    electric costs around 3x the price off gas for the same amount off heat so iff you have gas its far cheaper than electric on running costs
    also worth thinking about plinth heaters that will be far more responsive than underfloor
     
  4. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    Thought about all that and with the current situation, electric underfloor is better even if it is costly to run.

    Any answers on the original question of using socket with 3pin plug to run heating?
     
  5. copea

    copea

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    The kitchen is a notifiable location under Part P so you can't do any DIY electrics in there.
    I make that statement without malice, based on the fact that if you were 'competent' to the required standard, you wouldn't be asking if you could do what you're proposing as you'd know the answer would be 'no'.
     
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  6. snb

    snb

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    Not very up to date are you? rules changed in 2013. . you only need to notify if adding a new circuit in a kitchen
     
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  7. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    I thought I was incompetent :LOL::LOL:
    I don't know why 'copea' thinks it has to be notified under part P as what I am proposing is simply plugging in the underfloor heating to the electric socket.. similar to plugging in a room heater to the socket. I am not opening / altering / adding any circuit. Underfloor heating is a ready made mesh fronted by thermostat and what I am suggesting is to run that thermostat from the plug point as opposed to a new spur and internal wiring.
    Kitchen load is sufficient and got RCD in consumer unit.

    Still anyone think of any issue as I am planning to do this next week.
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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    to be fair you are"fixing" to the floor so an installation if you cant lift and move it its installed
     
  9. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    Fair enough... so is that an issue running it from socket in that case?
     
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  11. big-all

    big-all

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    well yes its a fixed item so needs to comply with part p as a new circuit
    but its up to you really will any one really know i doubt it
    but if you come to sell it may come back and bite you your choice really
     
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  12. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    Thanks.. I'll go ahead and do it then.

    I guess during selling, if buyer is too concerned about it, I can simply chop off the cable and let it be used as a simple underlay for the flooring :)
    Of course I won't be living in the house so let new owner to decide if he wants underfloor heating or not.
     
  13. big-all

    big-all

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    your choice really
    if you want to fudge the regulations that protect you and others thats your choice
    just remember in general they are trying to protect people rather than attack or penalize you
     
  14. copea

    copea

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    Fair enough, outdated knowledge.
    My apologies.

    This is still a terrible idea and not the right way to go about it.
    Why are you so determined to bodge it in this way?Surely it wouldn't be that much more work to do it properly?
    How are you planning to wire up the controller? They're meant to be installed into a back box/pattress, not hung off a flex.
     
  15. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    It needs to comply with Part P.

    But not because it is a new circuit, which it isn't.
     
  16. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Sam - what are you expecting the heating to do?

    Before it's too late (if it isn't), try boxing in one of your CH rads with a layer of wood like the kitchen floor, and see how well it works.

    Yes, I know that the charlatans who sell this type of UFH say you can use it under wood, but ye cannae change the laws of physics, and wood has a reasonable u-value.

    Plus, how much insulation is under the sub-floor?

    Basically, if you are hoping this will heat the kitchen, prepare to be disappointed. If you had a tiled floor, and were such a twerp that you refused to stop going on it barefoot, UFH would take the chill off, but that is not a problem with wood.
     
  17. Samsg30

    Samsg30

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    So what is the proper way?

    Using a back box for controller or putting cables behind the plaster board is no problem.
    The only question remains here is.. instead of spurring off the cable from back of socket and adding additional double pole isolation switch between power supply and controller (thermostat), can I not plug it in using three pin socket doing essentially the same thing?
     
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