Rear extension requirements

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Screech20, 20 Aug 2018.

  1. Screech20

    Screech20

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    Hey guys.

    I’ve currently got a planning application in for a loft conversation, of which we’re having trouble with the planning lot despite what most houses around here have got.

    Now with a baby on the way, we’ve decided that the loft is out of the question for now, but will still go ahead with the planning as we can make a start within the 3 years.

    Instead, we’ve decided to go for an extension on the rear of the bungalow, of which I would like to do myself.

    I’ve figured out that it will come under PD, but needs building regs.

    I’ve got all the ideas in my head, I mean, it’s just an extension coming out 2m out the back, but do I NEED to fork out on having proper drawings done?
    What do I NEED to get to make sure this is done legitimately and safely?

    I’m sure I’ll need a structural engineer for a steel for the roof to come off from, but as for the actual structure, I’d almost make it up as it goes.


    Any pointers?

    Thanks.
     
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  3. tony1851

    tony1851

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    If it's PD, you don't need plans drawn - you can use the Building Notice procedure whereby the inspector just checks the work as you go along (they will tell you/your builder at what stages they want to see the work).
    You must have a competent builder on board who is familiar with the regs, otherwise you will end up with problems.
    If removing a load-bearing wall, the inspector will almost certainly ask for structural calcs, which a SE will provide.
    You have the option of using either your local authority building control service, or using private Approved Inspectors.
    (BTW, did you really need planning permission for the loft conversion? - the vast majority can be done under PD).
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    I'm not sure if its one big one, or two little mistakes in the ground that will be more than the cost of some proper plans. But yes, if you think you know what to do, go for it.
     
  5. pilsbury

    pilsbury

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    I’d recommend drawing the building reg plans yourself and submitting a full plans application if you’re new to this. My reasoning is that is what I did being new to it all. It gave me time to think and plan instead of blundering in. BC can be sticklers if things aren’t done as they should be. At least with a full plans application all your elements are checked for you before you start. Could save pain down the line.
     
  6. Screech20

    Screech20

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    Thanks for the advice.

    I have decided to get someone in who will draw it up for building control approval.
    I did consider drawing it up, but then i don't know what's required in terms of footings, joist spans etc. This guy will also arrange the SE for any steels.

    We've only had a phone conversation so far, of which i said it is PD so just need him for Buildings regs and he said will will need to submit for a certificate of lawfulness (i kept quit at this point as i know these are frowned upon here on the forum, thought id bring this up when i actually see him)

    But then he asked is my plan was to make the roof of it higher than the current eaves, of which i do, because as far as i understand, and correct me if i'm wrong, the new joists will sit on top of the current wall plate, and then a warm roof (probably) will be built up from there.
    He said in which case it won't fall under PD and will need to submit a planning application because it's above the eaves.

    I have just had a good look through the PD rules on the .gov website, which i believe is THE guidelines to go by? and there is no mention of the roof having to stay below the original eaves height. All in says it that it must be within 6m of the original house, roof no higher than 3m and stay below the highest point of the roof.


    Any comments on this?

    Thanks.
     
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  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Ditch him.

    If that was his exact words then he is a clueless charleton and is out to fleece you.

    He does not "need" to, and it's not his decision to make.
     
  9. Screech20

    Screech20

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    I expected an answer like that to be honest.

    I'm not 100% sure it was his exact words, as it was a bad phone line, so i thought we could discuss it further on a site visit. He did say about it helping with the future sale of the house blah blah blah.

    Is it in his interested if he 'made me' apply for either cert of law or PP? What would he get out of it?


    He has quoted a fair amount for doing drawings which don't include any council fees so need to be sure this is what i need.

    I would be happy to 'just build it' its 'just 3 walls and a flat roof' - but i understand i need to pass the building regs with footings, insulation etc etc etc.

    thanks
     
  10. napoleondynamite

    napoleondynamite

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    Sound like he's clued up on the need for permission- see the Class A restrictions:

    A.1 Development is not permitted by Class A if—

    ...

    (d)the height of the eaves of the part of the dwellinghouse enlarged, improved or altered would exceed the height of the eaves of the existing dwellinghouse;

     
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  11. pilsbury

    pilsbury

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    If you need to go above your current eaves to get your flat roof insulation in you could do what I did. A mono pitch roof hiding the flat roof. This way you can continue the current eaves height and have a taller flat roof hidden behind. If my memory serves me correct max 3m eaves height, max 4m ridge height.
     
  12. Screech20

    Screech20

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    Thank you. I completely missed that despite looking through the whole lot!

    I have gone through the local planning website for people that have applied for cert' of lawfulness in my road and there seems to be a few. I can only guess they also missed the above point, and got away with it?

    IF i was to apply for a cert. of lawfulness by saying rear extension and quote all the necessary measurements, and it was agreed. What would they be able to do if they didn't like it a couple of years down the line?
     
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