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Removal of hydronic plinth heater

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by RRaynor0516, 29 Aug 2016.

  1. RRaynor0516

    RRaynor0516

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    I am in the process of renovating my kitchen and have come across a slight issue. After removing all the units I have found a hydronic plinth heater plumbed into the central heating system. To remove the heater would it be okay to simply remove the two pipes from the plinth heater unit and join them in a loop? Or Would this be something more complex that requires help from a registered plumber? Any advice would be much appreciated!

    The attached photo's show CH plinth heater and connections.

    Note:There is no separate isolation switch for supply to this unit.
     

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    Last edited: 29 Aug 2016
  2. HootingOwl

    HootingOwl

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    Don't join the pipes together. Just cap each pipe off witb a stop end.
     
  3. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Just remember to either release the pressure from the system or bung the F&E tank and vent to minimise getting water everywhere, be quick when cutting, inserts in and stop ending them.
     
  4. Agile

    Agile

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    I have never done it but it is probably possible to squash both pipes flat to close off the flow until you have fitted a cap.

    I think those heaters are very good.

    They may have a small value second hand.

    Tony
     
  5. Dan Robinson

    Dan Robinson

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    Arh man - you were brave typing that :LOL:
     
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  6. Madrab

    Madrab

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    oooer...you're not kidding o_O
     
  7. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    I thought that squashing pipes was only used for routeing gas pipes behind soil stacks.
     
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  8. oilboffin

    oilboffin

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    Squashing pipes wohhhh bad practice me thinks do it properly
     
  9. Agile

    Agile

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    I have a tool for squashing pipes.

    But it is really intended for mdpe water supply pipes. It can squash pipes up to about 60 mm diameter.
     
  10. PullerGas

    PullerGas

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    Hold up!! The OP is not proposing to do anything with the pipes, he's just asking for advice.

    My advice would be get a Plumber round with two 10mm caps. Shouldn't be a big job for a timeserved qualified guy in the know.

    Tony, it's very bad practice to squeeze 10mm plastic pipes, though it can be done in an emergency. Not sure you can deal with emergencies by Public Transort?
     
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