Removing bay window

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Hello. I am looking for some advice as to whether removing this bay window and replacing with a normal one would be a huge job (for professionals)? I would want to remove weird cladding around it and make the roof just in line with the rest of the roof. Any thoughts or advice welcome. Many thanks.
 

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Not a huge job no, as long as there is face brickwork beneath that insulated sill bulkhead. The soffit can be replaced with a minimal amount of cradling, plastic fascia /soffit board and trims.

The roof could be made good so that the valleys are removed and then reinstated on the existing line.
 
That’s excellent news, thank you. If it is non-supporting etc, do you think I’d need any sort of planning or other permission to remove the widow, replace with a flat one and join up the roof line? (Apologies if it’s an ambiguous - how long piece of string question)
 
do you think I’d need any sort of planning or other permission
You may need an application to BC or at least a phone call. It will depend on what is going on with the roof and the new window etc. Looks to me like the window may qualify for safety glass.

Not sure about planning but my gut says no.
 
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It's your house... but why would you spend a lot of money to remove it? The house would look plainer without it.
 
Hi. Maybe you’re right. I guess I have never been a fan of bays - they seem to make the room cold and there’s a bit of a condensation issue around this one
 
Many thanks again
No prob's.

Just to add: Whom ever does the job will likely need to do a bit of legwork prior to the job starting, i.e. remove the detailing around the bay window, get a stone sill made and have the window made ready to go in. Probably mean money up front etc.
 
Two things
It's a bow window, not a bay.
It's probably the worst idea you will have this year, but it's only May.
 
It's a bow window, not a bay.
I've often argued that a bay is something you can walk into and a bow is the other. Others dispute that and some online definitions too.

Anyway Woods, stop being so grumpy. What have you done with Freddie?
 
What have you done with Freddie?
Last I heard was that he had been transferred to DCLA after suffering an aneurysm when someone sent him details of how to construct a tiled roof below the recommended pitch. The padded rooms have no WiFi, unfortunately.

I'm maintaining the forum's grumpy quota until he's well enough to return. (y)
 
if you intend to take the Oriel cant bay back to flush with the outside wall surface then you may as well remove the roof down to the extn roof plane and do away with the intersecting pediment roof entirely.
ie. totally remove the bay and its roof and make good to the extn roof.
that way you eliminate valleys and any weird lookingness.

its just a job, no big deal.

given you are downslope on a hillside with a retaining wall then you might have a bit of damp where the extn returns into the main house.
i can see why they built the raised standing but maybe it wasn't the best solution.
 
It's an oriel window - it doesn't touch the ground :idea:(y)
An oriel window is one which projects much further out, and you can you can step into or at least sit in - like a bay but above ground level.

Whereas a bow window is like the OP's - a flat window with a bit of a bow in it. Like CLS from Travis Perkins.
 
if you intend to take the Oriel cant bay back to flush with the outside wall surface then you may as well remove the roof down to the extn roof plane and do away with the intersecting pediment roof entirely.
ie. totally remove the bay and its roof and make good to the extn roof.
that way you eliminate valleys and any weird lookingness.

its just a job, no big deal.

given you are downslope on a hillside with a retaining wall then you might have a bit of damp where the extn returns into the main house.
i can see why they built the raised standing but maybe it wasn't the best solution.
 

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