Rust prevention ideas?

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I took out some tools in one of the toolboxes in the shed I have bought a few years ago as joblot of toolboxes from a retired local carpenter. I didn't know even what was in them. When emptied into a plastic bucket with the rusty tool bits, mostly they were vintage auger, drill bits, chisels and plough plane bits. They were covered in thick rust and dirt.

I poured a bottle of malt vinegar into the bucket with the rusty tool bits, and left over night as I used to do for de-rusting old tools.

Next day, it was hard work cleaning each tool bits with wire wool. I have never seen that much of thick and dark rust coming off from irons like that. The water tank in the loft was emptied and refilled a couple of times for cleaning the de-rusted bits. Now most of the rust is off from the bits.

They are not 100% clean even after the de-rusting. There are bits with either deep pitting or dirts still on them which stuck too hard into the iron. I had to leave them as they are. It was too hard work rubbing with wire wool and taking too much time.

But they look a lot better now dried off. Now what would be best way to keep rust off these old tool bits? If I put them back as they are without any measure to protect them from rusting to the cold damp garden shed somewhere, guaranteed in few days, they would be rusty again.
 
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Wipe over with an oily rag (dampened with 3-in-1, sewing machine oil or camelia oil NEVER WD40 or Plus Gas which are not oils), put away in airtight containers and consider using VCI (anti rust) papers as well in the bottoms of sealed tubs, boxes and drawers. For longer term storage you can get a storage grease called Cosmoline (which is a pig to clean off, but good enough for the military to use) or take a look a BoeShield products (not cheap). You can also get dessicant sacks in various sizes from eBay or Amazon which contain silica gel to absorb moisture - I have a couple if them in my little lock-up and they are partly succesful, but I don't depend on them alone

Unfortunately once stuff like auger bits are pitted they become unsharpenable, so always best to store anything like that oiled. Planes can be cleaned up, but the faces if plane irons and the backs of chisels also need to be kept rust free
 
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Doesn't work for long term storage, though! OK for a week or two, but not for a winter or two
 
They are not 100% clean even after the de-rusting. There are bits with either deep pitting or dirts still on them which stuck too hard into the iron. I had to leave them as they are. It was too hard work rubbing with wire wool and taking too much time.

Next time, look up 'electrolysis'. It just needs a 12v car battery, soda, water and a suitable vessel. Effortless!
 
Don't bother with oil or grease. In constantly damp condition they can make corrosion worse.

Put them in a sealable box.

Job done.
 
Wipe over with an oily rag (dampened with 3-in-1, sewing machine oil or camelia oil NEVER WD40 or Plus Gas which are not oils), put away in airtight containers and consider using VCI (anti rust) papers as well in the bottoms of sealed tubs, boxes and drawers. For longer term storage you can get a storage grease called Cosmoline (which is a pig to clean off, but good enough for the military to use) or take a look a BoeShield products (not cheap). You can also get dessicant sacks in various sizes from eBay or Amazon which contain silica gel to absorb moisture - I have a couple if them in my little lock-up and they are partly succesful, but I don't depend on them alone

Unfortunately once stuff like auger bits are pitted they become unsharpenable, so always best to store anything like that oiled. Planes can be cleaned up, but the faces if plane irons and the backs of chisels also need to be kept rust free


I was thinking of WD40, because that is all I have. I had a can of 3 in 1 oil a few year ago, but it disappeared in the shed unused, cannot locate it. But I read WD40 not good for rust prevention somewhere too. Why is it? I used WD40 a few year ago cleaning rust off the cast iron wood stove sat in the garden for 20 years. It did the job. The stove looked great after soaked in WD40 spray, and the thick rust all around the stove and chimney, wire brushed off for a half hour.
 
I use WD40 or GT85 for tools that are stored in bags or boxes. No problems after months or a year or so. Easy to wipe off too.

I'll use Boeshield T9 or ACF-50 give better long term protection especially in exposed places.

I recently tried some Jenolite Waxoil spray, and that looks great for ultra long term storage or protection, but it does put a relatively thick wax coating on, which does not appear to be just wipe off-able.
 
Plastic bag storage is a good idea..

Those ikea double seal ones.
 
I took out some tools in one of the toolboxes in the shed I have bought a few years ago as joblot of toolboxes from a retired local carpenter. I didn't know even what was in them. When emptied into a plastic bucket with the rusty tool bits, mostly they were vintage auger, drill bits, chisels and plough plane bits. They were covered in thick rust and dirt.

I poured a bottle of malt vinegar into the bucket with the rusty tool bits, and left over night as I used to do for de-rusting old tools.

Next day, it was hard work cleaning each tool bits with wire wool. I have never seen that much of thick and dark rust coming off from irons like that. The water tank in the loft was emptied and refilled a couple of times for cleaning the de-rusted bits. Now most of the rust is off from the bits.

They are not 100% clean even after the de-rusting. There are bits with either deep pitting or dirts still on them which stuck too hard into the iron. I had to leave them as they are. It was too hard work rubbing with wire wool and taking too much time.

But they look a lot better now dried off. Now what would be best way to keep rust off these old tool bits? If I put them back as they are without any measure to protect them from rusting to the cold damp garden shed somewhere, guaranteed in few days, they would be rusty again.
You could end up doing that every year. Why don't you just leave them and clean them up when you actually plan to use them?
 
The electrolysis method of removing rust is very effective, and avoids further damage to old parts.

A plastic tank or bucket, washing soda, battery or DC power source is all you need.
 
I bought a new saw, some garden shears and a new blade for my old rotary mower 5 or 6 summers ago. Every year at the end of the season I clean them and spray them with a good amount of WD-40 before putting them away in the shed. They are still completely free of rust/corrosion.
 

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