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Semi garage conversion on a budget - help and advice please

Discussion in 'Building' started by seneca, 29 Dec 2018.

  1. seneca

    seneca

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    This is a long post I'm afraid, so for the patient, or very bored-

    I recently moved into a house that has a long room/store/garage next to it. It was originally a narrow (2m wide) passageway that went from the front of the house to the back. Blocks for sidewall, concrete slab for floor and a cold roof with two skylights. Garage doors open to front, door at back goes into the house.

    I paln to split it into two sections. One 3x2m front "garage type store." Walls, ceiling and floor untouched. Then a stud partition wall.
    The rear 5x2m section that has a step up and door into the house. I want to do a cheap makover to make it into a household store room with a freezer. It justs need to look tidy. I plan a suspended floor in this section to get it up to the house level. The step down will now be into the front "garage" section.
    This is a very low budget, low spec project with a lot of free leftover materials from a friend's 2 storey extension. The floor will be 5 lengths of 2x6 timber with 100mm rigid polystyrene between and 50mm air gap beneath (vented out from the step into the front "garage" section.) I'll cover it all with t&g chipboard flooring and then vinyl tiles over the top. Do I need to use noggins or timber slats running parallel underneath to hold the beams in place? There are no visible signs of damp, and as it is ventilated, can I skip a DPM?
    I've also got 8 50mm foil backed insulation boards. Could I fix these directly to the brick and block walls and timber roof beams to form a shell. It wont be warm, but better than the brick/block walls. What is the best way to fix these onto the flat walls and roof beams. the roof beams could be screwed but how about the walls? I don't want to dab, so frame fix or grab adhesive/foam?
    I originally planned to cover with bought plasterboards and covered with left over wall lining paper and painted. Could I skip the plasterboard expense and faff and glue lining paper directly onto the foil front of the insulation board? Assuming I got the boards level and caulked the joins, would it stick to the foil front? Does not need to be pretty, as there will be door fronted units for of household stuff (junk.)
    My plans may sound barmy and method flawed, but please give advice and improvment ideas. As you can tell, I've read a few previous froum posts, but am still clueless!
    Thanks
     

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  3. seneca

    seneca

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    Bump. Any thoughts anyone?
     
  4. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    although it wouldn't be classed as "habitable" I'd add stud work to the walls by screwing them on, with noggins, and add insulation, covering with plasterboard.
    Insulate the ceiling and plasterboard.
    Don't forget power and lights at this stage.
    It would be tempting to section off and add a partition wall so that the external doors form a mini shed. That's what a mate of mine did, leaving about 1.5M depth to store bikes and some DIY stuff.
    It would also provide a thermal barrier.

    I would also incorporate a DPC with can just be HD polythene tucked up a foot or so up the walls without cutting it. With my mate's we painted the floor first with bitumen paint as belt and braces.
    Then a floor substructure and chipboard.
    You could get a plasterer to skim it for £3-400 ( before the floor goes in)
     
  5. jonbey

    jonbey

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    I use this for fixing 50mm Kingspan to my internal brickwalls: Everbuild DRYFIX7 PINKGRIP DRY FIX

    As it's a small space and only for occasional use, I wouldn't go overboard on insulation, just get 50mm in there and some electric heaters, maybe tube heaters to keep the chill off.
     
  6. seneca

    seneca

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    Tigercubrider - that would be the thing to do if I had a budget to play with. Unfortunately, the house move has meant I have to get by with what I have. My mates freebies are welcome, and I hope to bodge something using them.
    The plan for my floor seems sound, from what I've read others doing. I thought by having the floor open on one end it would mean I didn't need a DPM? If I do, I'll get the polythene and run it up the sides. I want to get the floor, then line the ceiling and finish by doing the walls. The thing is, how to fix the insulation board to the brick wall? The Everbuild Dryfix looks good, but I will put in a few insulation dowels that hammer into the brick, just to be sure. What do you think of putting lining paper over the foil surface and painting? Do- able?
     
  7. jonbey

    jonbey

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    I think you should still plasterboard it before painting - the insulation boards are not strong, will easily get dented and foil broken if left with just paper to protect. Plus, there might be a fire hazard to consider.
     
  8. ivixor

    ivixor

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    If you really want to be cheap, just paint over the blocks and bricks, and paint the concrete floor. Then you'll have a nice garage. Put the insulation boards you have in the ceiling if you feel like it, though assuming the room is unheated, doesn't seem much point.

    But if you want more than that, do it right. A sheet of polythene DPC isn't expensive. Plasterboard is cheap too, if you don't bother getting it skimmed. Don't skimp on things you can't easily fix later.
     
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  10. seneca

    seneca

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    Fair point and will look into getting plasterboard. Would I push the insulation board tight against the wall and fix with the everbuild dryfix. Then plasterboard on top of the foil fronted face. What is the best way to fix the plasterboard to the insulation? Should I get some kind of hammer dowel fixing, drill therough the board and insulation into the wall. Then hammer the dowel through both boards and into the wall?
     
  11. ivixor

    ivixor

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    If you are reusing insulation sheets you already have you will need to build a stud wall. Timber and screws aren't too expensive.

    The insulation is cut to size and pressed in between the studs. https://thumbsnap.com/s/dztDLdAU.jpg

    Very straight forward to do. Then you would put a plastic vapour membrane over the insulation and studs, and then screw the plasterboard on top of that.
     
  12. seneca

    seneca

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    They are new insulation sheets given to me from leftovers a friend had from his extension. I like what you did ivixor, looks like a good model to follow. Any more info about what you did or a project thread to follow? I'm looking for some guides, but all very broad and for much bigger projects than mine
     
  13. seneca

    seneca

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    If the insulation is between studs, the insulation tight against the wall and the plasterboard is tight against it, where should the electrics run? should I make a channel in the back of the insulation and then a hole for any socket to attach to the wire?

    ivixor - you left a void with wires at the top, so celotex not up to ceiling. Did you compress the wire over the celotex and under the plasterboard, or did you run it behind the celotex and then through a hole out to the front of the plasterboard?
     
  14. ivixor

    ivixor

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    That's not my picture, it's just illustrative.

    Cables can go against the insulation, but behind the plasterboard. Make sure the studs are about 30mm deeper than the insulation to allow for that.
     
  15. seneca

    seneca

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    Just a thought, but what's the best way to insulate the roof area. The skylights take up a lot of it and there are a number of noggins and timbers that have been doubled up. If you look at my 3rd picture, you'll see a lot of small rectangles that form the structure. Each of these is around 150-180mm (due to firrings.) These are all closed spaces with no ventilation. Options I can think of:
    1) celotex board over the timbers, pressed up underneath and screwed in. Then plasterboard over them.
    2) Fill all the spaces with rockwool and plasterboard over (How to stop it falling down?)
    3) cut celotex to fit inside all the spaces and plasterboard over?
    4) plasterboard only (no insulation, but no risk of dampness due to trapped moist, warm air.

    Any thoughts?
     
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