Slotted concrete posts and fence panels

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by RrogerD, 29 Oct 2021.

  1. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    I'm going to be using 8' slotted concrete posts with 1' conc gravel board and a 5' wooden fence panel. My queries are:

    1) Do concrete end posts come with holes pre-drilled so that i can fix to the brickwork of the house or, do people usually use a wooden 4x4 post at the end and fix the panel to that instead?
    2) What size hole for a 4x4 concrete post?
    3) Do I need to use any form of hardcore with the postcrete?
    4) Should I sit the post on a bit of hardcore to stop it settling?
    5) How do you normally hold the post in place vertically, whilst the concrete sets?
    6) I know a hole auger (either mechanical or manual) is preferable for a neater hole but is it necessary? In other words, if the ground is soft enough to use a hole digger (the long poles with spades at the bottom), then does that mean it is too soft to support the post and will need to be bigger?

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: 29 Oct 2021
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  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    1) wooden. Not in contact with the ground. Galvanised fence clips nailed to it, or use stainless screws which last longer. You can paint the cips brown first to blend in.
     
  4. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Thanks
     
  5. pcaouolte

    pcaouolte

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    2) The size of your spade. Keep the sides of the hole vertical.
    3) Never used it, always use a completely dry concrete mix well tamped down around the post.
    4) Chuck a bit of the dry concrete mix in the hole before putting the post in, you can add a bit more if the post is low or screw the post back and forth into the mix if it is too high.
    5) Enough dry concrete mix well tamped down (with a bit of wood) as you are filling the hole will hold the post in place with no additional support. You need to almost fill the hole with the dry concrete mix.
    6) No. A spade and a post hole digger will get the job done. You might need a post hole bar with a chisel end if the ground is really solid.
     
  6. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Before:
    20211011_161819.jpg
    After:
    20211103_143850.jpg All done. Happy days!
     
    Last edited: 6 Nov 2021
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  7. Dereekoo

    Dereekoo

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    Well done but with a bit more effort you could have got the tops of the posts/panels level with each other
     
  8. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Ouch!

    You're right. The five panels after the first one are an inch low. This will bring them up to the the first. The last ones step up to the end post by about 2 inches, that it fitted to a brick wall and cannot go any lower. Couldn't be arsed to mess about with it any more. I don't think the tenants will notice tbh.
     
    Last edited: 14 Nov 2021
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