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Solid wood interior door - How best to repair please?

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by milgo123, 1 May 2020.

  1. milgo123

    milgo123

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    I've got a couple of solid wood interior doors where the handles have pulled off as the material behind them is in a poor state. Question is how best to repair them so that I can screw the knobs back on please? See attached photo...


    [​IMG]
     
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  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Sleeve nuts.

    You will probably have to take out your old mortice latches and fit new ones, because modern ones have holes for the screws to go through, and out the other side of the door.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    it doesn't show up very well, but this one has a cut-out at the end for a screw, and a hole (this side of the square for the spindle) for another. These will fit a handle rose with two, three or four screws. You need to measure the backset (distance between the front plate, and the centre of the spindle square) precisely. It will probably be around 44mm but varies by age and brand.

    This superior type also has holes, but only for two screws. It is seldom used now, as it takes more time and skill to fit.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. milgo123

    milgo123

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    Many thanks for your quick and detailed response. It certainly gives me a direction to go off and investigate. The "backset" measures 60mm on my mortices. I'll have to see what I can find.

    Bedroom2.jpg Bedroom1.jpg
     
  5. SpencerFrank

    SpencerFrank

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    Please see a couple of suggested methods described in the attached .pdf, and drawings/photo

    cheers
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: 1 May 2020
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    They are probably "three-inch" latches then.

    The yellow Altro ones are very good quality.

    https://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/search?query=tubular latch

    But I can't see a 60mm size.

    Does it measure Imperial, to the nearest quarter-inch? You may need to find an old-stock one.

    Edit
    Yes, the old Legge model have a 60mm backset. You will find them on ebay. I don't know if they are still made new.

    Example
    Legge 3722 NP 79MM Tubular Latch (3722-NP)
     
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  8. milgo123

    milgo123

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    @SpencerFrank Thank you so much for taking the time to provide such a detailed reply. Both me/and the house (1895 victorian terrace) are of the opinion that adding to the "history" of the door is not a bad thing as they are reclaimed doors fitted throughout the property that show much of their history already, having been hung in their past with various lock/latch fittings throughout their long lives.
     
  9. SpencerFrank

    SpencerFrank

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    I have amended my post as the scarf version is a bit advanced, but have still kept it in at high level. I did not go into enough detail as the 'wedge' needs to be set in via a stopped edge, which avoids a feather edge. It is all very possible but maybe not DIY.

    The ply method or door flipping works we'll in most cases.

    For basic wood working knowledge and skills you can't beat Robert Wearing's 'The Essential Woodworker'. It's where I started 35 years ago. You can still find it on Abe books occasionally.

    Good luck
     
    Last edited: 1 May 2020
  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Ah - I looked up the Legge, and being an old design, it does not seem to have the screw-holes.

    Maybe Imperial make one.
     
  11. milgo123

    milgo123

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    The wealth of knowledge from real tradesmen so far has me in awe. Highlighting the massive void between diy and a lifetime of learning your trade.
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Looking at enlarged pictures of your door edges, it appears that there used to be a bigger mortice, which has been clumsily filled with a block of wood. If this is the case, and you can pick it out, you could work out the size of the original mortice, and the original lock, and fill it better, or put in a lock or latch of the original size. The modern tubular latch will not be original.

    Do you have any of the originals?

    I now can't see your first pic.

    The original might have been a four or five inch horizontal sashlock. These can be obtained. I am very fond of them. Or a rimlock before that, in a less grand house. The quality of the door, and size of house, will give clues.
     
  13. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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