Structural/subsidence issue? Worried

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Hi all -

First post on here so please don't be too brutal. Just looking a few opinions/bit of insight from anyone more knowledgable.

Have recently noticed the below on an end terrace I own - worried it might be a stepped crack indicating a subsidence/structural issue? House was built 1997 & I've owned for 3 years.

Any thoughts before I go any further would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
 

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That's nothing to do with subsidence.

Are you sure the house was not built is 1897? It certainly looks it.
 
Hi welcome to the forum.

No thats not subsidence, its just a minor fault in the brickwork up at roof level.

those bricks are the top course of the gable end so they are a bit vulnerable to coming loose -they may have been knocked when built etc.

(Woody beat me to it -he is the crack expert)
 
That's nothing to do with subsidence.

Are you sure the house was not built is 1897? It certainly looks it.

Meaning? In reference to brickwork or timber?

Thanks for the reply though. Aware timber needs attention.
 
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Hi welcome to the forum.

No thats not subsidence, its just a minor fault in the brickwork up at roof level.

those bricks are the top course of the gable end so they are a bit vulnerable to coming loose -they may have been knocked when built etc.

(Woody beat me to it -he is the crack expert)

Thanks for this. There are quite a few cracks around the interior of the house in different places as well. I'll maybe post them in here too just to double check - at the expense of rude comments like the first response on this no doubt.

Thanks for the reply though. To me it looked initially like a repointing issue. Then realised the possible stepped appearance and thought maybe it could be a stepped subsidence or structural crack in the mortar? Still not sure how them being knocked would have cracked the mortar that way but reassuring to hear it doesn't scream of subsidence!

Thank you
 
Meaning? In reference to brickwork or timber?

Thanks for the reply though. Aware timber needs attention.
The brickwork is awful if it's relatively new, but looks authentic if it's supposed to match in with something from two centuries ago.

Yes the timber does need a lick of paint ... or a match. The thing is with timber, when water has persistently got into the grain, it opens and it's very difficult to get a good coat of paint on it that will last.
 
The brickwork is awful if it's relatively new, but looks authentic if it's supposed to match in with something from two centuries ago.

Yes the timber does need a lick of paint ... or a match. The thing is with timber, when water has persistently got into the grain, it opens and it's very difficult to get a good coat of paint on it that will last.

brickwork doesn't look like that corner around the whole house, hence why I asked about that one corner.
If you're referring to all the rest of the brick work visible in the photo as well, I apologise for your snooty attitude but not for anything on a house that you have no reason to seem to be so offended by lol. House was built 1997 yes & is a small & inexpensive one. You've an attitude/superiority complex issue enjoy your night & thanks for advice!
 
The brickwork is awful if it's relatively new
Its more to do with the type of brick Woods and the method of pointing chosen. When you have a high suction/irregular arrissed brick, you have to think about the method of pointing that least shows off the irregularities.
Bar jointing those type always results in wavy joints. We usually go for flush pointing like on this job...
 
You've an attitude/superiority complex issue enjoy your night & thanks for advice!
Easy tiger!
Woods is a bit acerbic at times but knows his onions. And I'm always here to put him on the right track.(y)
 
Its more to do with the type of brick Woods and the method of pointing chosen. When you have a high suction/irregular arrissed brick, you have to think about the method of pointing that least shows off the irregularities.
Bar jointing those type always results in wavy joints. We usually go for flush pointing like on this job...
Would agree with that. They look like Tumbled bricks.
 
Ah diddums, did someone offend your little house, coochee coochee coo?

Instead of moping around being offended, get off your lazy ass and get some painting done FFS, before the house falls down - and if it does have it built back up so it looks nicer. (y)

Not really offended no, I was worried more than offended, but you have deliberately tried your best to offend me for some reason I'll acknowledge that yes.
Unfortunately I don't have unlimited money and time to do all the things that are needed to the house all at once - not because I'm lazy, maybe I'll get a pay raise for my 'key' work after this "pandemic" but don't see that either.
I'm in my 20's this was meant to be a starter house & I have been worried for most of the time since buying it that I'll not get any deposit back to move to anywhere else when I can - the fact the economy has now ground to a halt has me even more worried about that at the minute & now you're pointing out on an internet forum that the brickwork is terrible, house might fall down & should be rebuilt anyway. Never mind calling me lazy.
Thanks for the input re. subsidence, was all I was really looking for.
 

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