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Telecom (or Whomever it is ) Dropwires

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Terrywookfit, 11 Jan 2021.

  1. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    I will be converting my loft come spring time. Nothing fancy but it will require two 6m RSJ to hang the floor from.
    The steel supplier has a wagon with a Hiab type crane which will lift them to roof height, BUT
    there are two drop wires from a pole 30m away that cross my property to the houses next door. .One is about 3m the other 6m from my roof/ scaffold insertion point at a height of 4-5 m.
    This effectively prevents safely lifting the steels without damage to the wires.
    Are the service providers obliged to either temporally or permanently move them.?
    I have Lived here for 30 + years and have checked the deeds for any Wayleive which is none.

    I would appreciate advice from you learned gentlemen if you have any.
     
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  3. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Is there any reason why the steels cannot be spliced and therefore positioned in place with pure muscle?
     
  4. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    Apart from the extra cost from cutting /welding men on site chain blocks and time taken etc NO.

    What really boils my pi$$ is that somebodys cables feeding 2 other peoples internet cross My property without my permission and in doing so could cost me hundreds of £££.
    The one nearest the house to next door I could drop easily as we are on excellent terms.
    The other is a cantankerous old Basturd who reported his neighbour to the police because the scaffolder had left a tube over hanging on the second lift. so no way.
     
  5. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    On another forum, a ‘similar’ kind of query was raised to in this instance BT of which their reply was...

    “I can advise you that under Paragraph 10 of The Electronic Communications Code, (The Code) which is schedule 2 of the Telecommunications Act 1984 (as amended 2003), gives the operator ( BT in this instance) the right to fly a wire so that it passes over other land without having to obtain the agreement of the owner or occupier of that land.

    Explanation of paragraph 10 (Power to fly wires) of Schedule 2 to the Telecommunications Act 1984, as amended by Schedule 3 of the Communications Act 2003.

    Paragraph 10 gives the operator the right to fly a wire so that it passes over other land without having to obtain the agreement of the owner or occupier of that land. Should BT have to enter on to private land to erect the wire then agreement is required from the owner and occupier of the land.

    This right can however be exercised only if the wire is flown at a height of 3 metres or more from the ground or not within 2 metres of any part of the building over which the wire passes.

    An operator’s flying wire powers do not authorise the installation, without agreement of any apparatus needed to support, carry or suspend the wire.

    It also requires that a wire flown under these powers does not interfere with any business carried out on that land.”
     
  6. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    What in your opinion does the last paragraph translate as ?
     
  7. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    I’d see that mostly aimed towards non-residential sites and their associated businesses, for example... cables running across a builder’s yard.
     
  8. mattylad

    mattylad

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    We have a big storm coming at the end of the month...
    If the wires get damaged by the winds then, it will be an ideal time to move your steels ;)
     
  9. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    A few years ago when we had that wet snow the lines were almost touching my van roof rack, I doubt I could blame the wind.
     
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  11. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    Yes that was my thinking too!
    I still think it's fookin disgusting That wires belonging to them which make them a large amount of money, and were fitted without my consent, should prevent me from safely maintaining my property.
    In firearms law it is illegal to shoot over a strip of land without the owners permission. even if your projectile would land on your own ground.
     
  12. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    There is a lot of tension in a drop wire. It is enough to pull a person of a ladder if that person is not prepared for it.

    Contact OpenReach and explain the situation, if you are polite with them they may offer to assist you without making a charge

    As for wires over your property, if the situation was reversed and the wire bringing internet to your house crossed a neighbour's property would you be so annoyed at wires crossing other people's property.
     
  13. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Are you implying these wires have been erected within the last 30 years, i.e. while you have been living in the property?

    Are you only complaining about them now, implying you haven’t been able to ‘maintain’ your property within the last 30 years?

    A loft conversion in my opinion is not considered maintenance. As mentioned before, there are ways you can still safely carry out the works and it’s not their problem you do not want to pay that little bit extra to make it work.
     
  14. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    The original wires were here when I moved in.
    They have been a source of aggravation over the years preventing Topsoil and aggregates being tipped, pallets of stone offloaded by crane meaning a 40 yard barrowing exercise from a Roadside drop.
    Until new heavier wires were fitted last year when a new pole was put in It was necessary to stand on a large pair of steps with a long pole to lift them to load a skip wagon.
    As BG suggests I will see what they say but from my research it does not look promising.
     
  15. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    I would read that as including any sort of premises.
     
  16. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    That suggests to ne that the drop wires are too low.

    For what it is worth,

    There were 5 circuits ( 3 drop wires ) to my chimney ( my line and 4 business lines to adjacent properties ) ) One of the businesses needed an extra line. The idea of adding another drop wire to the chimney did not appeal to me. And OpenReach policy was to avoid attach new drop wires to chimney stacks.

    There followed a conversation between me and OpenReach. I offered a Wayleave for an under ground service across my yard in return for all the circuits moving to that cable and all the aerial drops being removed from my chimney.

    Quickly and efficiently carried out, no drop wires across my yard and no cost to me,
     
  17. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    'This right can however be exercised only if the wire is flown at a height of 3 metres or more from the ground or not within 2 metres of any part of the building over which the wire passes.'

    3 metres, 10 feet. Not very high. Ours, which pass over from the far side of the street, are around 18 feet from the ground.
     

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