Thickness of various wall types

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I am re-doing a bathroom dividing part of it off into a separate toilet. Space is limited and every inch counts. I have a bit of a dilema about what type of wall to use:

Wooden stud
Pros:
Cheap
Easy
Thin
Cons:
Relatively flimsy
Vulnerable to damp or leaks

Metal stud
Pros:
Thin (thinnest wall type possible?)
Should hold up better to damp than wood
Cons:
Cost
Still going to be flimsier than block/brickwork

Block
Pros:
Invulnerable to damp
Solid and likely to hold tanking slurry well
Cons:
Thicker than stud wall
Maybe not as easy to do well for a diy-er

Brick
Pros:
Invulnerable to damp
Very solid and likely to hold tanking slurry well
'Free' because I will have a left over pile of bricks from dismantling another wall
Cons:
Probably the hardest to do right for a diy-er
Thickness

Feel free to challenge my assumptions above or suggest alternatives. But mainly I am looking to rank all the interior wall types by thickness. Not too bothered about building regulations insulation and other diktats, etc because this will be done on the sly, just looking for what works best for me.
 
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if you want pipes in a wall, a stud wall is easiest

damp or leaks -those present a problem in any wall

you could use CLS studwork and say 50mm rockwall batts -which are sound deadening

you could do studs close together for more strength

or even screw on plywood one side, then 9mm plasterboard
 
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So lets say 15 mm plasterboard + skim, 50 mm batten, 10 mm PB, another 10 mm for tanking+grout+tiles = 85 mm or is that too optimistic?

Another place I lived in was a 1950s build with upstairs block walls. Made with low quality fly ash or similar crap (horrible for drilling) but they were pretty solid. I swear they must have been only about 60 or 70 mm thick - what is the minimum block thickness available today for this purpose?
 
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Just to mention I don't believe this wall will require any hidden pipes or cables, so this isn't a factor.
 
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So lets say 15 mm plasterboard + skim, 50 mm batten, 10 mm PB, another 10 mm for tanking+grout+tiles = 85 mm or is that too optimistic?

Another place I lived in was a 1950s build with upstairs block walls. Made with low quality fly ash or similar crap (horrible for drilling) but they were pretty solid. I swear they must have been only about 60 or 70 mm thick - what is the minimum block thickness available today for this purpose?
You can get 75mm blocks
 
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Cool, do these normally get used for partiton walls? Or are there issues?
 
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All your pros and cons are wrong.

Walls have been built with brick and timber for centuries and block and metal for decades with no problems.

The only criteria is that you know how to build and build correctly, and maybe the other criteria you have not mentioned - cost, ease, speed, mess and suchlike.

If your main criteria is space, then it will need to be 34mm CLS sideways
 

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