Tiling brick effect splashback between cupboards?

Joined
4 Jan 2009
Messages
459
Reaction score
5
Location
True North
Country
United Kingdom
Ive been asked to tile a kitchen for a friend and the wall with the splashback doesnt work out too well for the tiles being 200mm long x 100mm high bevel edged.

The space between the wall cupboards where the cooker hood will be fixed is 430mm wide leaving 30mm cut. Is this acceptable or will look poor?

To the left is a double oven stack and to the right a double cupboard then room corner.

Are there any alternative ways?
 

Attachments

  • 20230128_104405.jpg
    20230128_104405.jpg
    126.1 KB · Views: 64
Sponsored Links
Those sockets are going to be a pain to tile around (as an amateur)
when I do tiling (not for a decade) I always jiggle the starting point based on where the cuts are going to be and make a decision on where the thin bits will be less noticeable.
people won’t peer under the cupboards and look up. They won’t stare at the ceiling level either.
 
About 15 years since I did something similar to this layout but what I did was to start in the centre of the cut out. You then work to either side of it so you have an even pattern. Continue the lay along the lower section under the cupboards and hope the cut-outs around the sockets fall in to place. They obviously won't, (life's not that kind), so what I would do is to tile up close to them. Then cut out a cardboard template and accurately mark the outlines of the backing boxes, (disconnect sockets/switches making careful note/photo's of what wire goes where!). Cut out the holes in the cardboard. Now lay the tiles that are going to be fitted onto a large enough board on top of the worktop, making sure they are in line with where they are going on the wall. Once you have got a group of tiles on the board you can move it to the left a bit to allow siting of the full set, (end ones will go past the end and need to be trimmed to fit against the right hand wall). If using tile spacers make sure you use these to get the spacing correct. Now take the template and lay it on top precisely where it goes. You can now pencil in, on the tiles, where the cut outs will fall. It will also allow you to mark the cuts for any edges that will be too long/wide for the final row.

Hope this makes sense.
 
Thanks for the detailed reply. All good advice and normally I would apply this, but having not done any tiling for a long time I was unsure the best way to set this out. Normally I'd centre the splash back area so that once its up between the two cupboards theres equal cuts each side, then hope it works out for the the right hand side wall corner to make sure that's a decent cut. But since the tiles are 200mm wide brick effect, 430mm wide between wall cupboards where the extractor sits leaves 15mm cuts, 30mm if it wasn't brick. I've had to make a sacrifice and started with a full tile on the bottom left and it means the end of the row is 30mm and once up between the cupboards every other row has a 30mm cut at the end. It works out for the sockets too. Hopefully won't look too bad.

there always has to be a sacrifice, it's choosing the best one.
 
Sponsored Links
Very nice, I like that. Does it stay splatter free or are you forever trying to remove oil spit marks from the grout? I normally use a splash back for this reason.
 
Very nice, I like that. Does it stay splatter free or are you forever trying to remove oil spit marks from the grout? I normally use a splash back for this reason.
Not mine I'm afraid. I've used a standard brick pattern for my tiles (but with more convenient than yours - 40mm cuts)
20210909_184441.jpg
But I find the tiles a lot more forgiving than a conventional splashback.
It's easy to clean without scratching and the odd splash isn't as noticeable as if it were on a uniform background.
You can also use harsher chemicals such as sugarsoap, without worrying.
 
I would not use small tiles as a splashback the grout will be impossible to clean even with sealer .
 
the grout will be impossible to clean even with sealer
Fair enough, that's your opinion, but have you tried it?
My tiles have been up six years and as I've said, I find it's pretty easy to keep the tiles and grout clean.
 
Fair enough, that's your opinion, but have you tried it?
My tiles have been up six years and as I've said, I find it's pretty easy to keep the tiles and grout clean.
Yes tried it , grease soaks into grout as it’s porous .
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top