Two diamond blades in an angle grinder

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I recently had to remove some lead flashing and then slot it back into place.

I had previously been told that one should use two blades in an angle grinder to cut slots for the lead. Finding it difficult to push the lead back in to place, I decided to put two blades on my 4.5" angle grinder. I soon noticed that the spindle doesn't accept two blades. The blades just spun independently once the nut was tightened.

How are the slots normally cut for lead flashing?
 
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0498A578-A882-4F23-8C3F-8854F302EBAA.jpeg
 
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Just an ordinary stone cutting disc will be fine. Pointing might be a bit hard but mortar is soft, so are bricks if say it's a chimney (oblique).
Width of slot will depend whether you're going to use lead wedges or whatever. No need for two blades, just go along twice!
 
Just an ordinary stone cutting disc will be fine. Pointing might be a bit hard but mortar is soft, so are bricks if say it's a chimney (oblique).
Width of slot will depend whether you're going to use lead wedges or whatever. No need for two blades, just go along twice!

The lead that I removed was on a parapet wall at the end of an extension and access was difficult because of a massive sky light about 12" from the wall. The lead had been cut in 2' lengths and keep flopping as a I tried to push it back in. A wider groove would have made it much easier to push it back in.

As part of the back story- the client had a leak whenever it rained heavily. I pulled up a section of lead and discovered that I could push my fingers in to the gap between the "arris rail" and the brickwork.

20210921_102521.jpg

The arris rail is about 3" . I guessed that the volume of water that runs down that section must be running over the top of the arris rail and in to the cavity. I told the customer that some of the pointing was literally falling out when touched. I recommended that he get someone to sort it out. He asked the guy that had done some (really bad) pointing to sort it out. As we spoke to the fellow, I could tell that a lot was being missed in translation. In a hope to explain it to him, I ripped out the missing section in the photo. He said he would fill the void with expanding foam, paint it with bituminous roof paint, put the lead back and then use Lead Mate.

From the following photo I am not sure that he understands how to use Lead Mate

20210921_132735.jpg

Anywho, he replaced the single section. He didn't lift any of the other sections of lead and not surprisingly, when it rained, it leaked again...

I had to try to remove his LeadMate from the lead and then push it back in. To be honest, some of it didn't go as deep as I wanted but I am fairly confident that the issue was related to the massive cavities rather than flashing itself.
 
From the following photo I am not sure that he understands how to use Lead Mate
Or a lot more. Who says true craftsmanship is dead, eh? Nice to see tidy work where the tradesman cleans up after himself. Oh, wait...
 
The lead that I removed was on a parapet wall at the end of an extension and access was difficult because of a massive sky light about 12" from the wall. The lead had been cut in 2' lengths and keep flopping as a I tried to push it back in. A wider groove would have made it much easier to push it back in.

As part of the back story- the client had a leak whenever it rained heavily. I pulled up a section of lead and discovered that I could push my fingers in to the gap between the "arris rail" and the brickwork.

View attachment 250705

The arris rail is about 3" . I guessed that the volume of water that runs down that section must be running over the top of the arris rail and in to the cavity. I told the customer that some of the pointing was literally falling out when touched. I recommended that he get someone to sort it out. He asked the guy that had done some (really bad) pointing to sort it out. As we spoke to the fellow, I could tell that a lot was being missed in translation. In a hope to explain it to him, I ripped out the missing section in the photo. He said he would fill the void with expanding foam, paint it with bituminous roof paint, put the lead back and then use Lead Mate.

From the following photo I am not sure that he understands how to use Lead Mate

View attachment 250707

Anywho, he replaced the single section. He didn't lift any of the other sections of lead and not surprisingly, when it rained, it leaked again...

I had to try to remove his LeadMate from the lead and then push it back in. To be honest, some of it didn't go as deep as I wanted but I am fairly confident that the issue was related to the massive cavities rather than flashing itself.
That does look awkward. A grinding disc is a quarter inch thick; I know I've dragged them through twice or at an angle and got about double that to clear mortar out.. You used lead wedges to hold it in? ?
 

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