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Angle grinder wood chain saw blades

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by opps, 20 May 2020.

  1. opps

    opps

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    I know that wood cutting blades for angle grinders have been previously covered on this forum and that one killed a forum member.

    Anyone considering using one of the chain saw type blades on an angle grinder should watch the following video..,

     
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  3. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    Nah, what killed said member was a circular saw blade MODIFIED to fit an angle grinder. A very different prospect to the above.

    Nozzle
     
  4. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Still think anyone using one of these creations should be certified insane :eek:
    John :)
     
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  5. EddieM

    EddieM

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    Indeed, but that still looks suicidal.
     
  6. opps

    opps

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    Thanks, I was aware of that. I guess I phrased it badly. I posted the link to the chain saw type because I recall people recommending them over the standard saw blade.
     
  7. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Stumpy Nubs? Prophetic name, or what?
     
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  8. Stivino

    Stivino

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    That's the first time I've seen one of those. You wouldn't get me using one, it looks like a weapon of war.
     
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  9. StephenOak

    StephenOak

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    I have read about that incident. I thought that the blade caught and jumped hitting him.

    Why would that be more likely to happen with a circular saw blade rather than a circular-saw-type-blade that was specifically designed for an angle grinder?
     
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  11. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    Because the shape of the teeth, the speed of the cut, the diameter of the blade, the lack of 'sole plate' on an angle grinder all mean it's going to kick like mule.

    A chainsaw tooth is actually like a tiny tapered chisel with a depth stop which limits the depth of each cut action to a fraction of a millimetre. No such feature on a circular saw blade. No need to, as it's designed to be used with some surface to react against.

    Nozzle
     
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  12. Munroist

    Munroist

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    it looked like an accident about to happen that, what he was doing was just stupid, you always need to be aware of which way they could jump. Esp if using a cutter that looks like that. I may get one of those for the tool box but certainly wouldn't be using it like that.


    take a look at this ad on fleabay
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4-Angle-...355852?hash=item2f3ae20ccc:g:6TEAAOSwV31dhekb
    look at the image of the man using it, with ONE HAND, and the other bare arm and hand exactly where it is going to fly if it snags.
     
  13. Munroist

    Munroist

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    the depth stop on a chainsaw only really works where the chain is straight, that is why the end of a chainsaw is so dangerous, it is the end of a chainsaw that if it touches anything will cause the chainsaw to fly upwards. Angle grinders don't have kick back brakes which makes this incredibly vicious little disk so stupidly dangerous.
     
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  14. StephenOak

    StephenOak

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    Thanks. Some more specifics if I may.

    "the lack of 'sole plate'" - Surely that would apply whether it was a proper circular saw blade or one designed for an angle grinder?

    "shape of the teeth, ... the diameter of the blade"- In what way are they different on a circular saw blade to one designed for an angle grinder?

    To be clear, by "one designed for an angle grinder" I an not talking about the 'blade' he was using (with chainsaw like teeth). I saw those a while ago and I immediately thought they were an accident not so much waiting but demanding to happen.

    What I mean is something like this
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/F-MINGNIAN-TOOL-Circular-Carbide-Cutting-Grinder/dp/B082Z37CX4/
     
  15. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I think it might

    A blade designed for use on an angle grinder is supposedly of chip limiter design (rather like modern spindle moulded tooling) and has a limited number of teeth - generally 2 or 4. A few trade suppliers did stock that type for a while but have now desisted AFAIK because they are potentially breaching PUWER98 let alone other potential infractions. I was told that this type of blade was originally developed for tasks such as cutting out floorboards and soffits.

    What is perhaps telling is that none of the major saw/tooling makers or the leading industrial power tool manufacturers have seen fit (or at least seemingly) to sell saw blades for angle grinders (and this is part of the reasoning behind the weird arbor size on grinders of 22.2mm which I don't think has ever been used on circular saws). Almost everything you see on the market has more teeth and is of non-chip limiter design. These saws come from smaller Chinese firms who quite frankly seem to be totally ignorant of health and safety requirements in the west. I wouldn't trust any CE certification supplied with such tooling as it is almost certainly fake. The fact that these blades are available through amazon UK and on ebay UK should be of great concern.
     
    Last edited: 21 May 2020
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  16. StephenOak

    StephenOak

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    @JobAndKnock Thanks very much.

    That is a new expression to me (I'm very much DIY not trade). I have had a look and it seems like the idea is that the cutting surface does not engage that deeply with the material, so that the likelihood of the two binding (and the tool jumping) is limited. Is that right?

    So more like this
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/HERZO-Grinder-Cutting-Carbide-Carving/dp/B07TF5J8JZ/
    than what I linked earlier.
    [/QUOTE]

    Yes I noticed that. Some major players not doing something may just mean it doesn't fit them somehow, none of them
    probably tells a tale.

    Also, I just noticed that the third photo on the blade I previously linked to
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/512ELGxRyJL._AC_.jpg
    shows an angle grinder different to any I have seen. Making it more likely that these are intended for a different market.
     
  17. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Correct. The amount of material removed (effectively the "bite") is constrained which reduces the tendency to kick back (where the tool lurches backwards out of the cut and towards the user should they be unwary enough to be standing in the wrong place, i.e. behind the tool).

    Yes. That looks like a chip limiter design, although I'd expect to see a BG Test logo and probably a TUV logo as well on it somewhere if it had been tested and approved for use in Germany (the brand suggests German, perhaps)

    I think it's a tile saw, not a grinder. These look like a circular saw but run at a far higher speed and are designed to cut heavy ceramic floor tiles using a wet diamond cutting disc. I've occasionally seen commercial tilers pull one out to whip up a section of heavy duty floor tiling to make repairs - they are better guarded than ordinary angle grinders (meaning that they are mandated by a few main contractors) and are sometimes designed to work with water (dust) suppression. Also seen them used dry to make trimming cuts. Firms like Makita, deWalt, etc still make them or have made them in the past
     
    Last edited: 21 May 2020
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