What is this used for please?

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Hi all,

Can anyone tell me what type of pipe this is for?
I tried bending some 15mm copper pipe with no success but I could be using it incorrectly. :unsure:

Thanks.
Mark.
 

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Difficult to tell from a photo, but most are suitable for 15mm or 22mm copper pipe. If the pipe you are wanting to bend sits snugly into the shoe / former it should be the right size. If you have a look on youtube there are lots of videos showing how they work.
 
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1. Those benders are for soft copper pipe.
2. The mostly commonly used type of copper pipe used in domestic plumbing is "half hard".
3. Those benders can't handle half hard copper.
4. If you heat the copper to bright red, then quench or allow to cool in air, it will become soft and you might be able to bend it.
 
If the pipe doesn't sit tightly into the groove (former) then it's too large, as suggested those hand formers are usually for 8/10mm copper
 
1. Those benders are for soft copper pipe.
2. The mostly commonly used type of copper pipe used in domestic plumbing is "half hard".
3. Those benders can't handle half hard copper.
4. If you heat the copper to bright red, then quench or allow to cool in air, it will become soft and you might be able to bend it.

Would the heating and quenching make the copper weaker and therefore unsuitable for domestic plumbing?
 
1. Annealing makes a metal more ductile and easier to work. Like a number of other metals, copper work hardens when it is hammered / squeezed through an extrusion die.
2. There isn't much practical difference between the strength of soft and half hard copper, and either is quite suitable for domestic plumbing.
3. There is much wider use of annealed copper in air conditioning / refrigeration work, which tend to use narrower pipes. These lend themselves to bending more easily and can be used to form much tighter (small radius) curves.
 
1. Annealing makes a metal more ductile and easier to work. Like a number of other metals, copper work hardens when it is hammered / squeezed through an extrusion die.
2. There isn't much practical difference between the strength of soft and half hard copper, and either is quite suitable for domestic plumbing.
3. There is much wider use of annealed copper in air conditioning / refrigeration work, which tend to use narrower pipes. These lend themselves to bending more easily and can be used to form much tighter (small radius) curves.
Thanks for that, I think I will give it a go! (y)
 
1. That type of bender is typically used in HVAC work with smaller tube sizes.
2. If a 15 mm pipe will fit into the former (the semi-circular piece with a radial groove in it) then it may well bend 15 mm annealed tube.
3. If the tube won't fit into the groove without force it won't bend it.
 
I have attached a few more photos.
There are actually 2 benders.
One for 8mm, 10mm and 12mm.
The other for 14mm and 16mm.
I've also included the box that they came in that shows some other items which may help.
 

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