Wiring of multi LED downlights

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Hello all, slightly random (and quite possibly very, very stupid) question! I'm planning a flat refurb and looking at lighting, in this case for the kitchen. Given I'm in London, most builders/electricians are charging something like £70 per point (i.e. per switch, per socket, per light fitting etc).

If you get multi light fittings, how does the wiring work? Would they still be treated as a single point (so if you had 3 of them would still pay £70 in my example) or are they treated/wired individually, so it would be £210? Or maybe it depends on the type of light?

Link below is an example of the kind of light I'm talking about (not necessarily this specific one, more to explain better than my words). Any ideas/help would be much appreciated!

http://www.darklightdesign.com/prod...k-roof-2-recessed-downlight/nemo-ark/id/5848/
 
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If it is a fitting like your link, then that counts as one point, independant of how many individual lamps there may be in it.
Although, I would maybe charge additional for soemthing that different to the norm. The price per point normally applies to sockets, switches etc. Luminaires depends on type.

But before you go any further you may need to rethink this "flat refurb" wrt to lighting. Most flats are constructed as separate fire compartments plus accoustic materials between the compartments.
This means that the ceilings and some party walls are specially constructed as fire barriers and you cannot just go cutting huge holes in the ceiling. It is there to prevent the spread of fire from your chip pan to the rest of the building!

You may need to restrict your lighting choice to surface lights. Or lights that will provide the fire and accoustic properties of the ceiling.
 
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Taylortwocities - that's super helpful, thanks! The kitchen area is actually an extension, with no-one above. And the roof/ceiling is being re-done completely as I'm raising the height of the extension. My architect will (hopefully!) keep me on the straight and narrow with respect to building regs. I know you've got fire hoods and such for recessed downlights, but I'll get someone who knows what they're doing to advise on that.

The main reason I was asking was that, if as you say rather than £210 for the 3 points it might be closer to £100 (just as an example), I could get some "funkier" lights that ultimately wouldn't cost me any more.

Thanks again for the info, much appreciated.
 
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How the other half charge, eh? Takes me about 20 minutes per spot, including drilling the ceiling, and I don't regard that as particularly quick (the cheapo fittings I've bought require some dis/re assembly)
 
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Fair enough. I hope that your architect will build in a "warm roof" construction. I have seen so many extensions with the rafter space filled to spec with Celotex etc to meet the thermal requirements of building regs, then the owner decides that he wants recessed lights - this means great gobs of the insulation would need to be carved out. Then Building Control come along and kick it out.
 
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BC may accept an upgrade somewhere else to counter for that?
 
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That is:
  1. CD_2c.png
    One light, not two.
  2. CD_2c.png
    Stupidly expensive.
  3. CD_2c.png
    Unsuitable for lighting up a kitchen.
 
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That is:
  1. CD_2c.png
    One light, not two - as in it has one fitting, but 2 LEDs/lights
  2. CD_2c.png
    Stupidly expensive - agreed. It was an example, not the one I'd be going for, can't afford that!
  3. CD_2c.png
    Unsuitable for lighting up a kitchen - also agreed. Would have angled under cabinet LEDs to light the worktop. These would be more for the centre of room where i just "walk" rather than do anything productive....
 
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