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3ph to Single Phase

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by funinacup, 20 Aug 2021.

  1. funinacup

    funinacup

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    Sockets on far wall, isolators on RHS.

    The cable sizes vary as per first post, as do the breaker sizes. IIRC:

    1 x 16a on 2.5mm
    2 x 25a on 2.5mm
    2 x 32a on 4 or 6mm, have to check.

    Would only be able to use the 32amp ones for my 20 and 32amp machines I believe?

    Wouldn't be interested in doing anything major DIY but if changing the sockets is all then might be happy to do that, otherwise if using a lead in the short term is possible I'll do that until a spark can get in to make amendments.

    Neutral is present.

    I did consider swapping the sockets over to single phase ones and fitting wagos but wasn't sure what was best.
     
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  3. plugwash

    plugwash

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    I don't think i've ever heard of a 25A 3 phase socket, the standard current ratings for the "CEEFORM" style sockets are 16A, 32A, 63A and 125A (there are theoretically larger sizes, but i've never seen them in practice, single pole powerlocks seem to be the go to for portable power at really high currents).

    If the current rating on both ends is the same and the supplies have a neutral (I suspect they do, but you should verify) I see no problem with making up a lead with a 3 phase plug and a single phase socket. Leads with different current ratings at both ends are more dubious (though commonly constructed in practice).
     
  4. flameport

    flameport

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    You can't do anything DIY in a commercial premises.
     
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  5. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    Probably every factory I do work in has some DIY in it
     
  6. flameport

    flameport

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    Some people break the law and do dangerous things all the time.
    Doesn't make it correct or the right thing to do.
     
  7. funinacup

    funinacup

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    Gotcha. What the repercussions / what's stopping it happening? Is it an insurance voiding thing should anything go wrong etc?
     
  8. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    Never said it did,just pointing something out,how would you define DIY in a factory ?
     
  9. flameport

    flameport

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    The law with the associated guidance: https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsr25.htm

    Could be.

    If someone is injured, killed, or the place burns to the ground, those persons who made the electrical alterations will be the ones in court explaining themselves.
    If that happens to be some DIY type with no appropriate knowledge, experience, test equipment, insurance and all the rest, then it's not likely to end well.
     
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  11. Robin0577

    Robin0577

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    Yes, for the sake of compliance you really only have 2 options.

    1. Use a qualified electrician and obtain the appropriate certification for all works

    2. Buy an off the shelf, pre-tested and certified solution such as https://www.rubberbox.co.uk/32A-supply/RUB1852 that requires no modification to the fixed wiring.
     
  12. crystal ball

    crystal ball

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    One place I worked as an employee used the wagon driver & store man for compressed air pipe work installation, I always wondered how that would end up if it went pear shaped
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Although it virtually never happens, would the same not theoretically be true in a domestic environment?- after all, "if someone is injured, killed, or the place burns to the ground" as a result of incompetent electric work in a domestic environment, that presumably would be in violation of the relevant law (Part P of the Building Regs in that case), wouldn't it?

    Kind regards, John
     
  14. flameport

    flameport

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    Possibly, although building regulations and Part P of it in particular is rather brief in what's required.
    The EAWR 1989 is far more specific in what's required of electrical work, electrical installations and those persons carrying it out.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Yes, extremely brief, but, as you know, what little it does say is:
    .... and I would of thought that occurrence (due to work done) of your postulated "someone is injured, killed, or the place burns to the ground" would be a clear indication that such 'reasonable provision' had not been made, and that law therefore had been broken, wouldn't it?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. Adam_151

    Adam_151

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    While thats likely to be the case, generally any action would be using the EAWR regulations, as relying on building regulations would limit offences to being non indictable and pretty low down on what sentence could be imposed
     
  17. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    In a non-domestic environment, yes - but EAWR would presumably not apply to DIY work done by a property owner within domestic premises. I was merely pointing out that there were also laws that could be contravened by such work in a domestic environment.
    I'm no lawyer, so I'll have to take you word for that. However, I would imagine that in some cases there would be potential for prosecutions for other (indictable) offences - if death(s) were involved, all the way up to 'negligent manslaughter', or whatever it would be called (and, I would also imagine, plenty of scope for potentially very expensive civil actions if substantial damage to property and/or persons was involved), wouldn't there?

    I really just wanted to 'warn' people that the issue is not just about commercial/industrial installations, and that incompetent DIY work undertaken within someone's own domestic premises can also "not end well" in legal/financial terms.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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