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Advice on fix: Damp floor inside balcony doors.

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by JamieApartmentOwner, 6 Feb 2021.

  1. JamieApartmentOwner

    JamieApartmentOwner

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    Hi, I am putting down new flooring on our top floor apartment (2007) that we just bought.

    One room has a balcony. It seems dampness is coming in from the balcony - particularly after rain [maybe that's obvious :eek:) ].

    Is there any way to fix or mitigate this before putting down vinyl?

    Any advice welcome and appreciated. See photos.
     

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  3. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    It's difficult to tell from the pics you've posted, however it looks as though the slabs/tiles outside are almost level with the upper lip of the door frame/threshold. Regardless, if it were me, I'd be lifting the row of slabs/tiles that butt up against the frame to assess what's going on. Water ingress is maybe happening under the frame, thus leading to damp patches inside. Taking the slabs/tiles off not only gives you a chance to assess what's going on, but to then take proper remedial action. As long as the bottom of the frame appears sound, the fix could be as simple as ensuring the bottom of the frame (where it meets the balcony floor) is adequately sealed to prevent water and moisture getting in. Then re-lay the slabs/tiles and ensure sealant is used where they butt against the frame.

    If you don't want to do any of this, you could try (as a first less intrusive fix) ensuring any gaps between the slabs/tiles are sealed i.e. where they butt against the frame. Also ensure the grouting between the slabs/tiles is sound.
     
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  4. JamieApartmentOwner

    JamieApartmentOwner

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    Thank you for the comprehensive reply, sir diy_fun_uk!

    My concern about taking up the tiles is not damaging them / damaging under them / rain making it worse while I am exploring / putting them back down wrong :)

    In terms of a tradesman - who would be most appropriate to contact for support?
     
  5. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    That's a valid point. It might even be possible to resolve by not lifting anything outside. For example, if the diagnosis is water's getting in underneath the frame, it might be possible to resolve from inside e.g. removing some of the interior flooring immediately beside the frame and sealing around and underneath. However I suspect repairing from outside is required and will offer the best solution. A competent general builder should be able to advise, and by that I don't mean some random man with a van and a few tools! Look for someone that has experience and good reviews.
     
  6. Bodgedbuild

    Bodgedbuild

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    Could I add, from your pictures it appears that the bottom balustrade rail that is attached to the balcony slab might be causing water to pool on the balcony. Does it have any drainage channels to stop this happening? If so, are they clear?
     
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  8. JamieApartmentOwner

    JamieApartmentOwner

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    I actually cleared it today, small but of build up of moss blocking it but nothing major. It is located off to the right hand side top corner!

    Thank you! My greatest concern is that it is a DPM / floor height issue. Checked today and the tiles outside are just about lower than the concrete slab internally.
     
  9. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    It's a valid point. Looking at those pics again, it appears as though the balcony is relatively narrow i.e. only 2 runs of tile. With that in mind and if your budget can stretch, I'd be tempted to have them all lifted to determine what's going on underneath and if drain holes are required as per bodgebuild's reply. However we're working off pics, a competent tradesperson might be able to advise of a repair that doesn't involve that degree of work. If you get to the stage of needing replacement tiles, a competent tradesperson will know to ensure they run ever so slightly away from the building, thus ensuring water doesn't pool at the door frame.

    EDIT: After seeing your reply, given there's an existing drainage hole, try pouring some water on the balcony to determine if it's running towards drainage i.e. not pooling. Even though you have drainage, if the tiles aren't angled slightly towards it, you might still get pooling at the door.
     
  10. JamieApartmentOwner

    JamieApartmentOwner

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    I'll get onto it this week and let you guys know how it goes. Appreciate all the ideas.

    The balcony actually sits on top of the apartment unit below (over a bedroom) just to add an additional consideration to the mix!
     
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  11. diy_fun_uk

    diy_fun_uk

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    Yeah do let us know, I like to see how things play out and what the eventual fix was :)
     
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