1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Drilling into a brick wall

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by NewtothisDIY, 3 Jul 2020.

  1. NewtothisDIY

    NewtothisDIY

    Joined:
    3 Jul 2020
    Messages:
    14
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi there,
    I am totally new to DIY and keen to learn to do simple things myself.

    I want to hang a TV in my conservatory onto an exposed brick wall.

    I have a Ryobi ONE 18V drill which has two gears and 24 clutches. It also has a hammer setting. The TV bracket says to use a 10mm drill piece and I have recently brought a BOSCH set of masonry drill bits.

    For drilling into brick..which gear would I need and which clutch speed is needed? Do I need to drill a smaller hole first?

    Any help/advice would be much appreciated! Many thanks
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. flameport

    flameport

    Joined:
    10 Mar 2007
    Messages:
    9,494
    Thanks Received:
    1,866
    Location:
    Poole, Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hammer setting, high speed, no clutch.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

    Joined:
    30 Dec 2018
    Messages:
    6,071
    Thanks Received:
    874
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It might be easier to drill a pilot hole first, around 4mm where you need the 10mm holes, then work in size to the full 10mm.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,157
    Thanks Received:
    4,032
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    An 18v combi drill with a masonry bit is adequate for small holes in ordinary red housebricks or lightweight concrete blocks, which is most domestic jobs such as shelves, curtain rails, coat hooks. If you want to do big holes for pipes, or drill into hard concrete, you will need a different sort of drill.

    buy a block of brown 35mm plasplugs, which IMO are the most suitable for such jobs. In the central plastic plate that the plugs are attached to, you will find sample holes for suitable drills and screws, and description. Keep this plastic guide for ever.

    When you drill into a plastered brick or block wall, disregard the thickness of the plaster which has no strength. Your plugs and your screws must penetrate at least an inch into the brick behind. Tap your plugs just below the surface of the plaster as thiswill reduce cracking and will be easier to fill and decorate over when no longer required.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,157
    Thanks Received:
    4,032
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    in the middle, see?

    [​IMG]

    it also tells you the preferred drill size (7mm)

    in crumbly bricks you may need a smaller size, or to pack the hole with builders adhesive such as no-more-nails before pressing the plug in.

    Vacuum out the loose dust from the hole.
     
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,157
    Thanks Received:
    4,032
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    oops, sorry, I see you said 10mm hole and masonry screws... which do not need plugs.

    As Harry says, 10mm is a bit big for your little drill in one go.

    you will need plugs for your shelves and curtain rails, though.
     
  9. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,235
    Thanks Received:
    689
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    They are quite good drills.
    Deffo start small and make bigger as it's easy to go off line and using a series of bigger bits helps stay on target. Sort out your hole position so one hole isn't in a silly place.
    Modern TVs are incredibly light so assuming it's new, you'll be fine
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. NewtothisDIY

    NewtothisDIY

    Joined:
    3 Jul 2020
    Messages:
    14
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thank you very much everyone. I'll try a smaller hole and work up to 10mm.

    JohnD - thank you for the suggestion, I need to put up some curtain rails next so these looks good.
     
  11. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

    Joined:
    30 Dec 2018
    Messages:
    6,071
    Thanks Received:
    874
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Even the best hammer drills become less effective after a lot of work on hard masonry, the hammer mechanism wears. If you are planning a lot of such work, its probably best to look at SDS Plus drills and bits. They go through most materials, including concrete like butter, but use special SDS bits.
     
  12. NewtothisDIY

    NewtothisDIY

    Joined:
    3 Jul 2020
    Messages:
    14
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks folks - gave it a go on Monday and managed to get it up with relative ease. Started with a smaller hole and then worked straight into to 10mm.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page