EICR and Fuseboard change

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Hi All,

I have a property with the old style fuse wire boards. I need an EICR certificate as well.

One tradesman has said they will carry out the EICR first to find any faults with the existing wiring and then change the board to a new consumer unit to finish the test and issue the EICR?

I have been told it would be additional costs if faults are found with the existing wiring/fuse board?

Is this the correct process or should the new consumer unit be fitted first and then EICR? Does it matter which way?

Thanks,

Abdul
 
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New consumer unit then EICR. If EICR dons first then the report will be littered with Non compliances that will be eliminated by the new consumer unit.

note that a new consumer unit is not a general “cure all”
 
New consumer unit then EICR. If EICR dons first then the report will be littered with Non compliances that will be eliminated by the new consumer unit.

note that a new consumer unit is not a general “cure all”


Thank you, understood.
 
If the EICR is done before the CU change then it will have a bunch of failures on it which would have to be explained, it would also starts the clock ticking on the new landlord obligations.

If the CU change is done before any inspection and testing then that increases the chances of being left with an installation where the power cannot be restored until additional remedial works are carried out.

So your tradesman's approach of combining the activities makes sense. Do the inspection and initial testing before the CU change, but hold off on actually issuing the EICR until afterwards.
 
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A new consumer unit should result in an EIC - Electrical Installation Certificate - and is notifiable to the Local Authority.

Whether you then also need an Inspection report to satisfy the landlord inspection requirements is anyone's guess.
 
A new consumer unit should result in an EIC - Electrical Installation Certificate - and is notifiable to the Local Authority.

Whether you then also need an Inspection report to satisfy the landlord inspection requirements is anyone's guess.
You would of course still require the report as the certificate only certifies the work done (i.e. replacement of the DB) and nothing else. There's really no guessing nor any ambiguity involved.
 
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I would say EICR first it correct method, as if it is found that the installation has excessive leakage then it may need RCBO's fitting instead of RCD's or it may need a rewire before and type of RCD is fitted, I had this with mothers house, guy tried to fit a new consumer unit then found leakage too high, he was lucky before 2008 so he could leave it with only part RCD protected.
 
I would say you do the EICR tests first to inform what work is needed before the Cu swap, but you then do the swap and retest as necessary before issuing the EICR paperwork.

Just as, when my car goes in for annual service and MOT, I expect the mechanic to draw my attention to anything that would cause an MOT failure BEFORE doing the actual MOT, so that it can be fixed first.
 
Thank you - all makes sense,

I've arranged for the EICR and then the consumer unit to be installed.

Yes, I'll need the EICR as it is for a tenanted property.
 
Hasn't this got a bit confused, Surely the way to do it is to do and log the IR tests [as it's generally that which caused problems] and check for borrowed neutral, if all is well change the board and complete the rest of the tests.

One doesn't actually need to produce the EICR between basic tests and board change.

Or am I missing something?
 
No, you're not missing anything.
As suggested, the "informal" pre-CU-change tests sufficient to determine if there's going to be any major issues, then a CU change, and as part of the CU change do any remaining checks for an EICR. Then it's a matter of turning the handle and popping out two bits of paper - an EIC for the board change, and an EICR to keep the landlord legal. Lets face it, if you are doing it properly, most of what you'd need to do for an EICR is being done anyway. And if the initial checks indicate something may be amiss, it's not triggered the 28 day rule while you work out the best way forward.

I can see a lot of landlords getting shafted by this. The agent will tell them "you need an EICR, we can arrange this for £x", landlord says to get it done, then EICR comes back with a long list of "vague fails". Landlord now only has 28 days to get things fixed, but other electricians look at the EICR (when asked to quote for remedials) and reply "dunno, how long is a piece of string". So original sparky gets to over-charge for remedials as well as doing a poor EICR.
Or perhaps I'm just getting too cynical these days :whistle:

EDIT: Of course, many will leave it to the last minute, so sparkies will all be very busy - further reducing options.
 

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