Extension Electrics

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Application does make reference to part P, 17th edition, inspection and testing. (only thought to look after these replied mind ;) While BCO was satisfied that the works were not "notifiable", he would still require evidence of testing and mentioned a "BS7671 certificate", to which I asked if a MWC was acceptable and he seemed to say yes. No issue with this being done by someone who is not registered tho.
Fair enough.
FWIW he also mentioned that any "part P notifiable" work will always incur a minimum £400 for the council's subcontracted electrician to inspect etc, which he said makes it "never worth your while" to do it that way, which reading other part P stuff online didnt surprise me much but is useful to know for future ref.
Indeed - but bear in mind ('for the future') that, if you're in England, there is now very little work which is notifiable. The most common notifiable work is probably a 'new circuit', and it's often possible to get a self-certifying electrician to install a very limited new circuit, and then you can subsequently 'extend' that circuit (which is not notifiable) if you so wish.

Kind Regards, John
 
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"New radial circuit for a socket" sounds notifiable to me! Do you perhaps not mean a 'new cicuit'(i.e. from CU)?

Well, it was moving a socket on a radial circuit, but the entire cable and socket were replaced back to the CU (all 3 metres of it). New circuit or not?

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't have notified even if it was a completely new circuit, but in this case it's probably not a "new circuit" under the daft rules.

The BC is not negligent in not inspecting my electrics, any more than he is negligent by not inspecting any other random parts of my house which have nothing to do with my building regulations application.

The fact that the non notifiable work HAPPENED to take place NEAR other work which was notifiable is neither here nor there.

If i had moved a lightswitch upstairs while having him inspecti some foul drainage i was installing, does that mean he now needs a certificate for the electrical work which was not notified or notifiable? Of course not.
 
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"New radial circuit for a socket" sounds notifiable to me! Do you perhaps not mean a 'new cicuit'(i.e. from CU)?
Well, it was moving a socket on a radial circuit, but the entire cable and socket were replaced back to the CU (all 3 metres of it). New circuit or not?
If there were some sort of circuit (ideally a sockets one) connected to the MCB in question previously, then I would say that it wasn't a 'new circuit' - you can replace anything you want, or extend any circuit, without creating a 'new circuit' which requires notification.
To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't have notified even if it was a completely new circuit, but in this case it's probably not a "new circuit" under the daft rules.
Shhhh :)
The BC is not negligent in not inspecting my electrics, any more than he is negligent by not inspecting any other random parts of my house which have nothing to do with my building regulations application. The fact that the non notifiable work HAPPENED to take place NEAR other work which was notifiable is neither here nor there.
I'd say that was fair enough, provided that electrics had not been mentioned in the application. As BAS has said, once BC are formally aware of the fact that an extension involves electric work, I suspect that they are duty bound to satisfy themselves that the electrical work (even if 'non-notifiable') satisfied Part P before they produce a Completion Certificate (relating to everything that was mentioned in the application).

Kind Regards, John
Edit: formating tidied up
 
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If i had moved a lightswitch upstairs while having him inspecti some foul drainage i was installing, does that mean he now needs a certificate for the electrical work which was not notified or notifiable? Of course not.
If you think that that is the same as building an extension in which electrical installation work is done then you are raving mad.
 
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If i had moved a lightswitch upstairs while having him inspecti some foul drainage i was installing, does that mean he now needs a certificate for the electrical work which was not notified or notifiable? Of course not.
If you think that that is the same as building an extension in which electrical installation work is done then you are raving mad.

Ok, if my new extension requires a new lightswitch, a new light pendant, and a socket, exactly how is that different from doing that work anywhere else in the house?

Are you going to say that the new plaster will make a difference? Or perhaps it's different because it's in a new room? Old rooms are less risky places to undertake electrical work, is that it?
 
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I'm not saying it is different, or more risky.

I'm saying that if the project for which Building Regulations approval was needed, and for which a completion notice will be sought, includes electrical work then the council will (or really really should) want to satisfy themselves that the electrical work complies with the Building Regulations before saying that it does.
 

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