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Extension help - roof ideas

Discussion in 'Building' started by coxy17, 10 Jul 2019.

  1. coxy17

    coxy17

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    Hi

    I am looking to extend my 1930 semi detached house and I'm just deciding to either extend single storey or double. The reason is that the roof of the existing house is causing the dilemma. Basically the existing house has a hipped roof and the last part of the roof cuts into the top bedroom where it meets the eaves (see picture attached as i do not know the name of this type of roof where it essentially cuts into the room). This lowers the ceiling height from 2.4m to 2.05m. So if we added in a doorframe to lead into the new extension on the first floor it would look strange (as the top of the doorframe would be almost at ceiling height).

    20181118_104021.jpg 20190616_173429.jpg 20190616_173417.jpg

    So far I have only managed to draw one idea which is basically what my neighbour has done which involves tying in the pitched extension roof into the existing roof. but they just had their 2 meter extension to extend the existing room and said 15 years ago it was very expensive to roof it. Plus they only extended 2 meters on the first floor and 3 meters on the ground floor. I would like to extend further if possible.

    The only other vague idea was to not tie in the extension roof and maybe have a hipped/pitched roof on the extension a valley guttering between the new and old roof? but I feel this maybe would not work as the eaves height maybe would be a problem?

    Anyway any advice or ideas would be great! in regards to making a double storey extension roof look appealing and require less work than the attached idea. Ideally the only roof type i would like to avoid is a flat roof.

    Existing plan
    Existing Plans.jpg

    proposed idea 1
    Proposed Plan 1.jpg

    Thanks

    Nick
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2019
  2. Ian H

    Ian H

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    If you carried the roof over as it was then you could have a full height door anywhere but in the corners buy building the wall up. You might build it up anyway to hold your new ridge beam.
     
  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    You're confused? So am I.

    Just mimick the existing lines and levels, and put the extension ceiling higher than the wall plate. You will find that the new walls are thicker so the wall plate is higher anyway, so you get less of the angled ceiling. Bear in lind the roof timber sections will be deeper than the existing ones so this could affect the plate height too

    Draw a section view of both walls (existing and new) at the eaves and you will see. The reference point will be the top of the rafters, so adjsut the plate and ceiling height accordingly.

    You most certainly wont get your detached roof idea through planning, but its not necessary anyway.
     
  4. coxy17

    coxy17

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    haha I make myself confused with overthinking ideas.

    thanks for the replies, I assume that the plan i have is probably the best option. I was just thinking that the roof seemed very large for just a small extension. I'll go an draw the section view of both walls at the eaves and from this estimate the cost etc.
     
  5. wessex101

    wessex101

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    Just my tuppence worth. As neighbour already has 2 storey extension think about where your side wall will be in relation to the boundary and how your roof eaves and guttering with interact with next doors. I can foresee one of those crazy situations where neighbour sets theirs back from boundary, you set yours back and you are left with a wasted gap between and the 2 sets of guttering touching. That really does my head in.
     
  6. coxy17

    coxy17

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    Thanks for this, it is something that is now playing on my mind. I hate that they have guttering which can be only accessed from my side, but I have only recently purchased the property, I have no idea why the previous owner agreed this was ok! but as the guttering edge is just touching the boundary there is not much I can do they are not infringing on my airspace :(

    This is why I was trying to come up with a more viable solution to the roofing idea so i can avoid having to have guttering down my neighbours side. But looks like I'm out of options on the two storey roofing. Maybe the only vague idea at the moment is some sort of mono pitched roof, but the problem is that my house as a hipped roof, so I cannot start the extension roof higher than the eaves/rafters to key into the rafters higher up so I can achieve a good enough slope out 4 meters.

    It seems like I have the most unfortunate situation.
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2019
  7. wessex101

    wessex101

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    The sensible solution is for your neighbour to let you butt up against their extension and form a tapered box gutter where the two roofs meet. Who knows, major charm offensive, flowers, wine, chocolates...maybe even cold hard cash, they might agree to it.
     
  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    I don't think it is. Any such design may have several risks and potential issues, and that does not include the awful appearanace of having the two houses joined up in th efirst place.

    The council's planning guidelines will determine if the extension can go to the boundary or not. Its no good trying any options that will never be permitted in the first place. Find out what will be allowed, and then think of the technicalities and practicalities of achieving it

    This roof and extension situation is common and not at all out of the ordinary or even a problem in the first place.
     
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